When alleged rapes are before the criminal-justice system, the question of whether to identify the alleged victims is tricky. But the matter is quite different when it comes to civil court, since money, not jail time, is at the crux of such cases. Nevertheless, even after the criminal charges against Kobe Bryant were dropped and the incident moved into the civil arena, most news organizations declined to name Katelyn Faber, the woman who claimed Bryant had sexually assaulted her. The Rocky Mountain News was an exception to this rule, and its use of both her moniker and photograph proved to be entirely fair, reasonable and straightforward.


Best Nickname in the Kobe Bryant Case

Mr. X

The settlement of the Kobe Bryant case robbed the public of a homegrown spectacle that might have rivaled the Michael Jackson trial -- although it's unlikely Bryant would have shown up for court wearing pajama pants. Still, voyeurs got a hint of what might have been, thanks to Eagle County court reporter Michelle Goodbee, who accidentally e-mailed over 200 pages of transcripts from June 21-22 pre-trial hearings to the Denver Post and several other major news organizations. The best revelation came courtesy of Dr. Elizabeth Johnson, who said that accuser Katelyn Faber's purple thong underwear contained DNA from an unknown person she referred to as "Mr. X." We may never know this mystery man's identity, but one thing's for sure: X marked the spot.

Best Nickname in the Kobe Bryant Case

Mr. X

The settlement of the Kobe Bryant case robbed the public of a homegrown spectacle that might have rivaled the Michael Jackson trial -- although it's unlikely Bryant would have shown up for court wearing pajama pants. Still, voyeurs got a hint of what might have been, thanks to Eagle County court reporter Michelle Goodbee, who accidentally e-mailed over 200 pages of transcripts from June 21-22 pre-trial hearings to the Denver Post and several other major news organizations. The best revelation came courtesy of Dr. Elizabeth Johnson, who said that accuser Katelyn Faber's purple thong underwear contained DNA from an unknown person she referred to as "Mr. X." We may never know this mystery man's identity, but one thing's for sure: X marked the spot.


A lot of yakkers rely on stunts, shtick or the sort of speechifying that toes one ideological line or another. Not Peter Boyles, who's survived for decades in the Denver market precisely because regular listeners don't always know what he's going to say about a particular issue before he opens his mouth. For that matter, neither does Boyles, an idiosyncratic contrarian who rejects the one-size-fits-all approach. Folks who tune him in weekday mornings may find themselves agreeing -- or disagreeing -- with him when they least expect it. And that's good radio.
A lot of yakkers rely on stunts, shtick or the sort of speechifying that toes one ideological line or another. Not Peter Boyles, who's survived for decades in the Denver market precisely because regular listeners don't always know what he's going to say about a particular issue before he opens his mouth. For that matter, neither does Boyles, an idiosyncratic contrarian who rejects the one-size-fits-all approach. Folks who tune him in weekday mornings may find themselves agreeing -- or disagreeing -- with him when they least expect it. And that's good radio.


The Fan may be the best-known sports-talk broadcaster in Denver, but it no longer has the best morning show, and Tim Neverett can take much of the credit for that. Working in conjunction with Denver Post columnist Jim Armstrong (a past winner of this prize, and deservedly so), Neverett keeps the program moving no matter the topic or theme, and his smart, no-bull approach to interviewing and breezy, conversational style is a lot more user-friendly than the tedious homerism so prevalent a few clicks down the dial. Real sports fans will be impressed.
The Fan may be the best-known sports-talk broadcaster in Denver, but it no longer has the best morning show, and Tim Neverett can take much of the credit for that. Working in conjunction with Denver Post columnist Jim Armstrong (a past winner of this prize, and deservedly so), Neverett keeps the program moving no matter the topic or theme, and his smart, no-bull approach to interviewing and breezy, conversational style is a lot more user-friendly than the tedious homerism so prevalent a few clicks down the dial. Real sports fans will be impressed.
During the late '90s, Jay Marvin manned the afternoon-drive slot on KHOW, and his show was a highlight of the era -- animated, thought-provoking and consistently unpredictable. Marvin subsequently left for Chicago, but when execs at AM 760 decided to add a local host to the station's primarily syndicated format, they invited him back. Wise move. Marvin is as persnickety as ever, and his presence provides the outlet with some much-needed personality: his.
During the late '90s, Jay Marvin manned the afternoon-drive slot on KHOW, and his show was a highlight of the era -- animated, thought-provoking and consistently unpredictable. Marvin subsequently left for Chicago, but when execs at AM 760 decided to add a local host to the station's primarily syndicated format, they invited him back. Wise move. Marvin is as persnickety as ever, and his presence provides the outlet with some much-needed personality: his.


Best New Denver Radio Station -- Commercial

AM 760

Not so long ago, talk-radio aficionados even slightly to the left of John Wayne were pretty much out of luck in these parts. After all, most attempts to broaden the spectrum -- e.g., KNRC -- have ended badly. It's too early to say if AM 760 will reverse this trend, but the station has a better chance than most of its predecessors thanks to Clear Channel, its deep-pocketed and generally conservative corporate parent. Meanwhile, local libbies can enjoy Jay Marvin and high-profile fare from Air America that would otherwise only be available online.

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