Old downtown Aurora has gotten pretty rundown over the years -- and that's precisely why the city's officials have put so much time and money into revitalizing it. The centerpiece of their efforts is the new Martin Luther King Jr. Library, a downright glamorous-looking neo-modern building by Michael Brendle that opened last year. The facility, which also houses city offices, is constructed of gray brick accented by big sheets of ethereal blue-tinted glass, with rectangular volumes stepping in and out of the main pavilion. The structure is striking and has become an instant landmark -- but Aurora will need more than that to get this grungy area back on track.


The old Tivoli brewery that now serves as the Auraria Higher Education student center received a couple of interior updates after it quit shipping suds in 1969. But it wasn't until last year that the seven-story, circa 1890 building got a facelift that stripped away years and many layers of paint, making it a worthy landmark at the edge of downtown.

The old Tivoli brewery that now serves as the Auraria Higher Education student center received a couple of interior updates after it quit shipping suds in 1969. But it wasn't until last year that the seven-story, circa 1890 building got a facelift that stripped away years and many layers of paint, making it a worthy landmark at the edge of downtown.


The JOA may have preserved Denver's two competing dailies, but Brenda Bailey-Hainer and her Colorado Historical Newspaper Digital Project may save many, many more with their statewide historic newspaper database, searchable by both subject and publication.

The JOA may have preserved Denver's two competing dailies, but Brenda Bailey-Hainer and her Colorado Historical Newspaper Digital Project may save many, many more with their statewide historic newspaper database, searchable by both subject and publication.


At this time last year, practically everything about the Denver Post was unattractive in the extreme. The photographs were blurry and indistinct; the type style was smudgy and clotted; the layout was haphazard. Then a team led by Damon Cain, the paper's managing editor for presentation and design, tore up the previous template and started from scratch. The new concept debuted last May, and it was a revelation -- an elegant broadsheet that's extremely readable and easy on the eyes. These days, the ugly duckling of Denver newspapers is a lot closer to being a swan.
At this time last year, practically everything about the Denver Post was unattractive in the extreme. The photographs were blurry and indistinct; the type style was smudgy and clotted; the layout was haphazard. Then a team led by Damon Cain, the paper's managing editor for presentation and design, tore up the previous template and started from scratch. The new concept debuted last May, and it was a revelation -- an elegant broadsheet that's extremely readable and easy on the eyes. These days, the ugly duckling of Denver newspapers is a lot closer to being a swan.


Jeremy Hubbard took over Channel 31's weekend anchor slot from Phil Keating, who had a lock on great locks. That's a big barber chair to fill, but Hubbard is up to the challenge. His follicles frequently shoot skyward like geological outcroppings, yet the shape and size of the ledges and projections tend to shift from show to show, and even segment to segment. As a result, watching Hubbard read headlines is akin to using time-lapse photography to observe the formation of Red Rocks -- which, like his hair, is truly a natural wonder.
Jeremy Hubbard took over Channel 31's weekend anchor slot from Phil Keating, who had a lock on great locks. That's a big barber chair to fill, but Hubbard is up to the challenge. His follicles frequently shoot skyward like geological outcroppings, yet the shape and size of the ledges and projections tend to shift from show to show, and even segment to segment. As a result, watching Hubbard read headlines is akin to using time-lapse photography to observe the formation of Red Rocks -- which, like his hair, is truly a natural wonder.


Many women who make the transition from radio to television aren't allowed on screen until they've been given the regulation beagle-ears haircut that's rightly regarded as a broadcast cliche. Fortunately, KOA-banterer-turned-sportscaster Susie Wargin has avoided this fate. Her lush, pre-Raphaelite tresses curl along the sides of her face or twist overhead like benign, dirty-blond variations on Medusa's snakes. This is the boldest and wildest 'do currently seen on the Denver tube. It has so much attitude that it could probably deliver the sports all by itself.

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