When it debuted in 1998, Radio 1190 was a godsend for the disgruntled radio listener -- a blast of fresh, inspiring music spun by CU students whose sense of excitement burst through the speakers. Nearly seven years later, the thrill isn't gone. DJs come and DJs go, but the station continues to serve as a valuable resource for any music lover who wants to hear the finest new sounds from nearly every popular genre and some not-so-popular ones, as well. Radio 1190 is a life raft in a sea of homogenized sound.


Best Commitment to Local Music by a Commercial Radio Station

The Mountain

A lot of for-profit radio outlets talk a good game about supporting local bands and musicians, but it's mostly lip service. The Mountain is an exception to this rule. On The Mountain Homegrown Show, a specialty program that airs Mondays at 10 p.m., host Jake Schroeder, of Opie Gone Bad renown, spotlights performances and interviews with prominent local talent. As a bonus, the station also sponsors regular showcases for these folks at venues like Bender's Tavern, and it sprinkles tunes by Coloradans into its regular playlist.

Best Commitment to Local Music by a Commercial Radio Station

The Mountain

A lot of for-profit radio outlets talk a good game about supporting local bands and musicians, but it's mostly lip service. The Mountain is an exception to this rule. On The Mountain Homegrown Show, a specialty program that airs Mondays at 10 p.m., host Jake Schroeder, of Opie Gone Bad renown, spotlights performances and interviews with prominent local talent. As a bonus, the station also sponsors regular showcases for these folks at venues like Bender's Tavern, and it sprinkles tunes by Coloradans into its regular playlist.
Once upon a time, on radios very much like those commonly sold today, DJs had unique personas that set them apart from everyone else on the airwaves. But such individuality has been on the wane since corporations discovered that air personalities, like nuts and bolts, cost less when they're interchangeable. So praise be for Gregg Stone, aka Uncle Nasty, whose gruff tone, tough-guy lingo and deep knowledge of hard rock and heavy metal continue to distinguish KBPI on weekday afternoons.
Once upon a time, on radios very much like those commonly sold today, DJs had unique personas that set them apart from everyone else on the airwaves. But such individuality has been on the wane since corporations discovered that air personalities, like nuts and bolts, cost less when they're interchangeable. So praise be for Gregg Stone, aka Uncle Nasty, whose gruff tone, tough-guy lingo and deep knowledge of hard rock and heavy metal continue to distinguish KBPI on weekday afternoons.


Communities that have banned pit bulls may want to rewrite their laws to cover Dan Caplis and Craig Silverman, KHOW's new team. Like the controversial breed of canines, they won't let go once they've sunk their teeth into someone -- especially when that someone is embattled University of Colorado professor Ward Churchill. For months, the legal twosome has devoted most of its broadcast to cataloguing Churchill's alleged sins, and rather than report on other reporting, the two have uncovered new recordings and documents that have advanced the story. Even those who disagree with their conclusions have to acknowledge their doggedness.
Communities that have banned pit bulls may want to rewrite their laws to cover Dan Caplis and Craig Silverman, KHOW's new team. Like the controversial breed of canines, they won't let go once they've sunk their teeth into someone -- especially when that someone is embattled University of Colorado professor Ward Churchill. For months, the legal twosome has devoted most of its broadcast to cataloguing Churchill's alleged sins, and rather than report on other reporting, the two have uncovered new recordings and documents that have advanced the story. Even those who disagree with their conclusions have to acknowledge their doggedness.


No, you can't fire Ward Churchill for what he's said. And the University of Colorado Regents won't buy him out, for fear of what everyone else will say. So why not merge the school's two longest-running scandals and let Ward Churchill lead Ralphie off the ignominious field of CU's roughest legal battle, letting the pair ride off into the sunset -- and out of the headlines? Go away, Buffs!

No, you can't fire Ward Churchill for what he's said. And the University of Colorado Regents won't buy him out, for fear of what everyone else will say. So why not merge the school's two longest-running scandals and let Ward Churchill lead Ralphie off the ignominious field of CU's roughest legal battle, letting the pair ride off into the sunset -- and out of the headlines? Go away, Buffs!


One-time University of Colorado film students Trey Parker and Matt Stone took note of their alma mater's most infamous professor with an episode of South Park called "Die Hippie Die," in which a character named Crunchy referred to "little Eichmanns," using Ward Churchill's most infamous utterance.

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