According to most television-news experts, viewers prefer old, comfortable faces to new, unfamiliar ones -- but Asha Blake blows right through that theory. Denver's newest anchor looks young, but she has an extremely impressive resumé, having hosted such national programs as Later Today and Good Morning America Sunday, and she displays all this skill and savvy on Channel 2, whose ratings-challenged late-night newscast desperately needed the star power she delivers. While Blake is still a relative unknown in this city, she's worth getting to know.


The turnover of talent on Channel 9's 10 p.m. newscast has been enormous. With the retirement of Ed Sardella, the ship-jumping of Mike Nelson and the ignominious removal of sports hunk Tony Zarrella, only anchor Adele Arakawa remains from the crew that had attracted large audiences for years, and her new counterpart, Bob Kendrick, isn't exactly Mr. Charisma. But Roger Ogden, the station's president and general manager, came up with a surefire way to compensate, bringing up weathercaster Kathy Sabine and sportscaster Drew Soicher from the outlet's ultra-successful morning show. Thanks to their presence, the newscast has been revitalized -- much to the chagrin of its competitors.
The turnover of talent on Channel 9's 10 p.m. newscast has been enormous. With the retirement of Ed Sardella, the ship-jumping of Mike Nelson and the ignominious removal of sports hunk Tony Zarrella, only anchor Adele Arakawa remains from the crew that had attracted large audiences for years, and her new counterpart, Bob Kendrick, isn't exactly Mr. Charisma. But Roger Ogden, the station's president and general manager, came up with a surefire way to compensate, bringing up weathercaster Kathy Sabine and sportscaster Drew Soicher from the outlet's ultra-successful morning show. Thanks to their presence, the newscast has been revitalized -- much to the chagrin of its competitors.


When Channel 9 raided its own morning show to fill holes at night, Channel 4 decided to rise and shine to the occasion. The chemistry between early-a.m. personalities Scott Sander, Brooke Wagner, Ed Greene, Wayne Herman and Mark McIntosh, supplemented by the ace traffic team of Luan Akin and Lynn Carey, rivals that achieved by Channel 9 before the old gang split. The departure of Sander this March could change that, but in the meantime, one thing's clear: The contest for Denver TV supremacy in the mornings is no longer a one-horse race.
When Channel 9 raided its own morning show to fill holes at night, Channel 4 decided to rise and shine to the occasion. The chemistry between early-a.m. personalities Scott Sander, Brooke Wagner, Ed Greene, Wayne Herman and Mark McIntosh, supplemented by the ace traffic team of Luan Akin and Lynn Carey, rivals that achieved by Channel 9 before the old gang split. The departure of Sander this March could change that, but in the meantime, one thing's clear: The contest for Denver TV supremacy in the mornings is no longer a one-horse race.


Drew Soicher's move from Channel 9's early shift to its late one hasn't been controversy-free. Some viewers unfamiliar with his sardonic approach find him too shticky for their taste, and he's often tardy covering a lot of high-profile events, including most Broncos games, because he doesn't work weekends. So pardon us for once again giving our regards to Drew, who's solidified his position as the most entertaining and unpredictable sportscaster on the Denver airwaves. He's got balls.
Drew Soicher's move from Channel 9's early shift to its late one hasn't been controversy-free. Some viewers unfamiliar with his sardonic approach find him too shticky for their taste, and he's often tardy covering a lot of high-profile events, including most Broncos games, because he doesn't work weekends. So pardon us for once again giving our regards to Drew, who's solidified his position as the most entertaining and unpredictable sportscaster on the Denver airwaves. He's got balls.


From the beginning, Channel 31's 9 p.m. newscast had a weak link: former Broncos placekicker David Treadwell, who did a fine job gabbing about sports on the radio, but looked wooden and awkward in the glare of TV lights. The arrival of Eric Goodman, who most recently worked at a Fox Sports Net outlet in Chicago, has given the show a significant boost. He's a fast-talking, quick-witted sports nut from the old school; he's even got a facial mole, like a lot of broadcasters did in the years before TV news became so homogenized. He gives recitations of scores and stats the sort of boot Treadwell managed on the field, but not on the air. Hiring Goodman was a good move.
From the beginning, Channel 31's 9 p.m. newscast had a weak link: former Broncos placekicker David Treadwell, who did a fine job gabbing about sports on the radio, but looked wooden and awkward in the glare of TV lights. The arrival of Eric Goodman, who most recently worked at a Fox Sports Net outlet in Chicago, has given the show a significant boost. He's a fast-talking, quick-witted sports nut from the old school; he's even got a facial mole, like a lot of broadcasters did in the years before TV news became so homogenized. He gives recitations of scores and stats the sort of boot Treadwell managed on the field, but not on the air. Hiring Goodman was a good move.
Mike Nelson, the new weatherman on Channel 7, is as comfortable for Denver viewers as an old shoe. When Channel 9 balked at his salary demands, Channel 7 tossed lotsa cash at Nelson, and since making the move, he's done a lot more than sit back and count his money. He's forecasting up a storm at his new home, and although it's too early to predict fair ratings for perennial loser 7News, Nelson's off to a strong start.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of