Over the past few months, local skaters have been skeptically monitoring the progress of the new concrete skateboard park being constructed behind the Westminster Recreation Center at 10455 Sheridan Boulevard. They have good reason to be wary: The park's architects, Architerra Group, are responsible for the wonky designs of parks in Federal Heights and Littleton. Luckily, Architerra was aided by some knowledgeable skateboarders, and this park appears to be shaping up nicely. The street course, while a little cramped, has a great-looking pyramid along with some well-angled rails, stairs and ledges. The bowl, which features a loveseat, an over-vert section and a spine transfer, should please the most advanced pool rider. Gnarly. Props to the contractor, American Civil Constructors, and Architerra for a nice addition to the skatepark scene. Here's a tip for both companies: Hire those skateboarders on as real consultants for future projects -- and this time, pay them.

With so many new skateparks being constructed in recent years, it's easy for the latest generation of metro-area riders to forget that street skating originated in the streets. While the concrete playpen known as the Denver Skatepark has an unbeatable urban location in the Central Platte Valley, it's still true that the most fun and innovative places to skate are those that weren't created for the activity. Some of the city's top spots can be hit quickly in a geographical loop -- which is necessary to stay one step ahead of the cops. Try the ten-stair in Civic Center Park, the beautiful brick banks of the nearby Colorado History Museum, the selection of benches on top of Market Street Station, or the classic pink ledges at 16th Avenue and Lincoln Street.


With so many new skateparks being constructed in recent years, it's easy for the latest generation of metro-area riders to forget that street skating originated in the streets. While the concrete playpen known as the Denver Skatepark has an unbeatable urban location in the Central Platte Valley, it's still true that the most fun and innovative places to skate are those that weren't created for the activity. Some of the city's top spots can be hit quickly in a geographical loop -- which is necessary to stay one step ahead of the cops. Try the ten-stair in Civic Center Park, the beautiful brick banks of the nearby Colorado History Museum, the selection of benches on top of Market Street Station, or the classic pink ledges at 16th Avenue and Lincoln Street.

Golf is like sex: You want to do it as often as possible in as many places as possible. Another course, another notch on your belt. Should mini-golf be any different? At Putting Edge, you even do it in the dark, for crying (moaning?) out loud. But in real life, mini-golf is for kids, and to that end, Putting Edge is a juvenile showstopper -- and a good way to keep youngsters out of trouble. Everything in the place glows, and the usual lame-o windmills have been replaced with challenging, high-tech, sci-fi-looking holes that rush the sport well into the 21st century. It's a regular hole in one!

Golf is like sex: You want to do it as often as possible in as many places as possible. Another course, another notch on your belt. Should mini-golf be any different? At Putting Edge, you even do it in the dark, for crying (moaning?) out loud. But in real life, mini-golf is for kids, and to that end, Putting Edge is a juvenile showstopper -- and a good way to keep youngsters out of trouble. Everything in the place glows, and the usual lame-o windmills have been replaced with challenging, high-tech, sci-fi-looking holes that rush the sport well into the 21st century. It's a regular hole in one!

Amusement-park aficionados who feel pukey when confronted with the theme-park fluff of Six Flags Elitch Gardens should head to Lakeside and settle their stomachs on Colorado's most venerable roller coaster, the Cyclone. But don't expect to experience the gliding G-forces of today's modern steel rides: Built in 1940, the Cyclone clangs and jerks passengers through the dives and crests of the weatherbeaten wooden superstructure, making for some serious air time as thighs strain against the meager restraints and rears slide across the seats. Appropriately, the Cyclone is ranked as one of the few remaining classics by the American Coaster Enthusiasts, a group with over 8,000 active members.


Amusement-park aficionados who feel pukey when confronted with the theme-park fluff of Six Flags Elitch Gardens should head to Lakeside and settle their stomachs on Colorado's most venerable roller coaster, the Cyclone. But don't expect to experience the gliding G-forces of today's modern steel rides: Built in 1940, the Cyclone clangs and jerks passengers through the dives and crests of the weatherbeaten wooden superstructure, making for some serious air time as thighs strain against the meager restraints and rears slide across the seats. Appropriately, the Cyclone is ranked as one of the few remaining classics by the American Coaster Enthusiasts, a group with over 8,000 active members.

The debate about the perfect campground has probably raged in these parts since Og the Magnificent conked Thorg the Stupid with a saber-toothed tiger jaw during a heated debate. About ten miles southwest of Leadville lies a 22-site gem that can stand the test of even Og's debate. Located on Halfmoon Creek and nestled at the base of Colorado's highest peaks, Halfmoon Campground is truly a place to rediscover the reason Coleman makes so much camping gear. They don't take reservations, so it can be a gamble on weekends, but odds are you'll find a space at Halfmoon. And maybe a bit of a tiger jaw.


The debate about the perfect campground has probably raged in these parts since Og the Magnificent conked Thorg the Stupid with a saber-toothed tiger jaw during a heated debate. About ten miles southwest of Leadville lies a 22-site gem that can stand the test of even Og's debate. Located on Halfmoon Creek and nestled at the base of Colorado's highest peaks, Halfmoon Campground is truly a place to rediscover the reason Coleman makes so much camping gear. They don't take reservations, so it can be a gamble on weekends, but odds are you'll find a space at Halfmoon. And maybe a bit of a tiger jaw.

A non-profit venture located along the Sand Creek Greenway at Stapleton, the Urban Farm makes its greatest mark during the school year, when hundreds of kids of all ages pass through its gates to do everything from milk a goat to develop a breeding program for the whole herd. But the farm also supports year-round 4-H and equestrian programs, geared especially toward city kids who otherwise wouldn't necessarily have the opportunity to be around animals. Kids in need of a little horse sense but not lucky enough to attend a school that takes advantage of the facility can test the waters during the farm's summer horsemanship education program, which offers week-long and summer-length classes for all abilities. The program's price and heart are in the right place, too, so what are you waiting for? Saddle up!


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