The story goes like this: Rocco was a French pilgrim who traveled around northern Italy during the Middle Ages, risking plague-ridden towns to care for the ill. He eventually became the patron saint of pestilence, and the Potenza Lodge has honored him annually for more than sixty years at the three-day Feast of St. Rocco festival. Modern-day patrons can take part in games of chance as well as near-continuous raffles for home-baked cakes, salami, capicola and provolone. Attendees also vie for cash prizes at booths featuring pickle cards and an old carnival-style Big Six wheel. Both games have a house edge that would make the casinos in Black Hawk drool. But after a few pizzelles, Italian sausage sandwiches and cheap Coors Lights, a little risk in the name of pestilence doesn't seem so bad.
A good night of trick or treating requires several things: closely-spaced homes that cut down on walking and result in more candy gained; good lighting, but not too good; some large, well-decorated spooky houses; a safe neighborhood; and, most important, wealthy homeowners who give out the good stuff. While there are plenty of areas that combine these elements in Denver, Seventh Avenue Parkway has them all and more. Just ask the vanloads of kids from other neighborhoods who swoop down each October 31 like vampire bats and then disappear in the ghoulish night.
Video games are quickly ascending to a place of cultural dominance, joining movies and music in terms of earning power and cultural cachet. One of the biggest and best websites covering this transformation is Denver-based www.kotaku.com, which includes live coverage of key events, such as the recent Game Developers Conference, and original features on nearly every important thing in gaming. Managing editor Brian Crecente, a longtime veteran of the Rocky Mountain News, runs the megablog, continuing a tradition of delivering top-notch coverage.
Keyo the baby zebra was special and the snow leopard was certainly cute, but the two sets of golden lion tamarins were clearly the best Denver Zoo babies, for a couple of reasons. First, they are soooo cute, and the parents, Rosy and Simao, look like fuzzy three-headed monkeys as they move around with their babies on board. Second, the tiny tamarins — fuzzy, long-tailed Brazilian primates — are highly endangered (there's only about 1,000 left), and the zoo has had a lot of success with them. In fact, there were two sets born — Annie and Alex on June 25, and two as-yet-unnamed babies on March 10 — which tripled the Denver population. Here's to the happy family.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of