The road to the 2008 Democratic National Convention was paved with freebies. Free meals, free parties, free stuff, free bags to hold said free stuff. Of course, 99 percent of it was useless (the windmill lapel pins given out wouldn't even look good on Al Gore), but there was one display of killer, if temporary, swag: a thousand free bicycles, courtesy of the Freewheelin bike-share program organized by the convention host committee, Humana Inc. and Boulder-based Bikes Belong. Thanks to the crowds and the beautiful weather, the slick new green bikes were the coolest way to get around. In fact, the city was so taken with the idea that it plans to unveil a similar bike-rental program this summer. That's change we can believe in.
"Elegance" isn't a description usually associated with a TV anchor's coiffure. "Bet you could bounce a quarter off it" is far more common. But every time she appears, 7News anchor/reporter Theresa Marchetta classes up the set. Although her tresses appear to have been tastefully tinted (only her hairdresser knows for sure — but she has twins, and has earned any gray), they flow naturally, with none of the plasticized sheen favored by so many of her professional peers. Talk about delivering the news with style.

Best Hair on a TV Personality — Male

Kyle Clark

Kyle Clark's cut is multi-dimensional. When he's on assignment, the hard-charging correspondent's mop looks mildly mussy yet still under control. Think of it as Action Hair that perfectly complements those Jake Gyllenhaal eyes. In the studio, however, his 'do — enhanced with a little product — exhibits unexpected complexity, with its waves and ripples suggesting a particularly fashionable topographic map. Destination: cool.
And our guess is it smelled bad...
1800 Larimer
After the oil crash of the 1980s, it took two decades for new high-rise projects to begin appearing again in downtown Denver — and now that mini building boom is going bust. Given the current economic climes, the few buildings nearing completion could be the last of their type for quite a while. The most promising of the group is 1800 Larimer, a project of Westfield Development. As planned by the Denver architectural firm of RNL Design, the building will rise 22 stories and be topped by a penthouse with a striking butterfly roof. The exterior walls will be distinctive, too, covered in a Mondrian-esque pattern with deep-blue glass panels. But this building isn't just about looking good; it's also been designed to be as "green" as possible, with the plans already LEED-certified. This high-rise should be a stunning addition to the downtown landscape, and since over 70 percent of it has been pre-leased, it's likely to actually get finished.
We weren't the only ones blown away by Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War, the very first book by Thomas Andrews, an assistant history professor at the University of Colorado Denver. His account of the events surrounding the 1914 Ludlow Massacre — in which the Colorado National Guard stormed a mining colony, resulting in the death of twenty people, including eleven children — was a stunning debut, full of insight into the role of labor and class not just in southern Colorado, but across the country. Andrews's efforts were recently recognized with the Bancroft Prize from Columbia University, the top American history award.
Back in 1908, the Democrats trucked in piles of snow to amuse delegates to the Democratic National Convention. A century later, the best entertainment inspired by the 2008 Democratic National Convention may leave a more permanent legacy. Celebrate 1908 was a two-day, multimedia festival of political and historical flashbacks that brought the issues and arguments of 1908 back to the Tivoli Turnhalle on the Auraria campus in late July. Technically a benefit for Auraria Casa Mayan Heritage, an organization that commemorates the Latino community that centered on the Casa Mayan restaurant, Celebrate 1908 was a true celebration of the people whove contributed to the melting pot of Denver over the past century.
It looks like this fireplace escaped from the family room of some 1970s sitcom in search of a better life, then stopped to grab a smoke (because that's what fireplaces do) at the southeast entrance to Addenbrooke Park. That's not the real story, of course. This park was once home to a pioneering family for more than a century. Patriarch (and geologist) Tom Everitt built the original house, complete with a fireplace incorporating rocks from every state and some foreign countries, as well as Native American artifacts that he found on the property. The City of Lakewood acquired the site in 1987 and tore the house down in 1997, but kept the fireplace as a park centerpiece. After all, home is where the hearth is.
When Channel 2 merged with Channel 31, Ernie Bjorkman got the heave-ho. But he had something that other jettisoned anchors, such as 9News's Bob Kendrick and Channel 31's Steve Kelley, didn't: a great story. Seems Bjorkman had been preparing for life after television by studying to be a veterinary technician — a career transition that landed him in a story in the New York Times and a segment on 20/20. In fact, he received far more national publicity for leaving TV than if he'd stuck around.
Employees at the Rocky Mountain News did not learn that their February 27 issue would be the tabloid's last until around noon on February 26. This didn't give them much time to prepare their swan song, even though months earlier selected staffers had started preparing the 150th-anniversary tribute edition, which they'd hoped to publish on April 23. Somehow, though, the final issue of the almost-150-year-old Rocky managed to capture the paper at its best, from compelling history to excerpts from long-gone columnists to a back page listing the current employees. It's a testament to these journalists' professionalism and dedication that the Rocky went out at the top of its game.

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