A part of the Breckenridge/Wynkoop restaurant empire that opened last spring, Ale House at Amato's has a rooftop patio with one of the best views in all of Denver. But the patio isn't the only place at Amato's that offers a scenic panorama of downtown, the Platte Valley and the mountains. The men's room upstairs has a small window above the urinal that also offers some, uh, relief from the boring blank walls, giving you a very private opportunity to ponder life in this great city.

Best Bathroom With a View of Denver Art

Fuel

Need to see a man about a horse? How about seeing that man about some artwork? You can find paintings by Tracy Weil, co-creator of the River North Arts District, on cultured walls around town. But you'll never find a better reason to linger in a privy than at Fuel, where a pair of pieces by Weil — whose own gallery/studio Weilworks is just a few blocks away — grace the walls. "Makes for a captive and contemplative audience," the artist says.

The LoDo and Ballpark neighborhoods have been fertile soil for breweries, so much so that at Great Divide Brewing, an entire tank farm has sprouted out of the ground, bringing with it the strong and heady aroma of steeping grain and boiling hops. But like bagels, burgers, coffee and cookies, beer smells almost as good as it tastes, making the air around the corner of 22nd and Arapahoe streets a living, breathing advertisement for delicious homemade brews.

Sports Authority Field at Mile High

In the very first Best of Denver, published in 1984, John Elway was a rookie quarterback who looked like he might, just might, have a promising career in Denver. But no one could have predicted that Elway's career — and his status as the state's number-one celebrity — would get new life once Number 7 had left the field. After dabbling in car dealerships, vodka deals, arena football and restaurants, last year Elway returned to the Broncos as an executive, hiring a new coach and dealing with a quarterback controversy. But he really came into his own when he acquired Peyton Manning for the team...and jettisoned Tim Tebow. But then, Elway has always been known for last-second saves.

Readers' Choice: Tim Tebow

In the very first Best of Denver, published in 1984, John Elway was a rookie quarterback who looked like he might, just might, have a promising career in Denver. But no one could have predicted that Elway's career — and his status as the state's number-one celebrity — would get new life once Number 7 had left the field. After dabbling in car dealerships, vodka deals, arena football and restaurants, last year Elway returned to the Broncos as an executive, hiring a new coach and dealing with a quarterback controversy. But he really came into his own when he acquired Peyton Manning for the team...and jettisoned Tim Tebow. But then, Elway has always been known for last-second saves.

With as many hit songs as he's written for his own band, OneRepublic, as well as a slew of other pop stars, including Beyoncé, Kelly Clarkson, Jordan Sparks, Leona Lewis and Gym Class Heroes, it's surprising that Ryan Tedder didn't already have a mantel full of Grammys. But while he's been nominated before, Tedder couldn't claim a Grammy until now, when he won for his contribution to Adele's breakthrough album, 21, which all but owned the Grammys this year. Something tells us this is just the first of many to come for the Colorado musician.

You don't have to live in Hollywood to walk the red carpet. Back in 1997, Donna Dewey took the prize for Best Documentary, Short Subject, with A Story of Healing. And this year, Colorado-based filmmaker Daniel Junge, who focuses on stories of social justice, repeated that feat, winning an Oscar for Saving Face, his documentary about a doctor devoted to helping women scarred by acid attacks in Pakistan. In a surreal moment, the actresses from Bridesmaids presented the award to Junge and his co-director, Pakistani Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy. Long story short, it was a big win for social justice, for Junge — and for the Colorado film community.

Comic strips might be an endangered species, but "Spinadoodles," Sam Spina's incredibly endearing cartoon, makes the form seem very vibrant. The Xeric Foundation award-winning Denver cartoonist has been dutifully drawing his comic strip every day since April 2009, publishing it on his website as well as in the Colorado Daily. Spina has a knack for turning everyday happenings into sweet comic renderings; his artistic diary often chronicles things that his cat does, conversations with his girlfriend and happenings at his pizza-shop job. Draw, partner!

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Denver International Airport has inspired many fine conspiracy theories — that it's a creation of the New World Order, that there are Martians living underground — but none as uplifting as the one exposed on The Colbert Report this fall. According to William Tapley, who calls himself both "Third Eagle of the Apocalypse" and "Co-Prophet of the End Times," DIA is full of phallic symbols — not surprising, since it's designed to look like a giant penis. We don't even want to think what role the new South Terminal will play in that scenario....

It's stripey! It's spiky! Her locks show as much spunk as Amy Stephens has as the House Majority Leader. The El Paso Republican may tout her conservative values, but there's nothing conservative about this 'do.

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