The controversy over Denver Boone is one of the most twisted to emerge in recent years. Designed by a Walt Disney artist, DB was the University of Denver's official mascot from 1968 to 1998, at which point complaints from various interest groups, including Native American organizations that saw him as a Manifest Destiny figure, led to his being replaced by Ruckus, a red-tailed hawk that excited no one. But Denver Boone never truly went away, and with DU still mascot-free after several subsequent efforts either sunk or stalled, he's rested and ready for a comeback. While he may never get that chance, he remains the epitome of the Pioneers spirit for plenty of alums.

Okay, so their outfits might be a little weird — especially the long-sleeved spandex "jerseys" that end right below the bust, making them about an eighth as long as normal shirts. But the women who make up the Colorado Avalanche's first Ice Girls squad are skilled skaters who serve a dual purpose: looking hottttttt during breaks in the game and using shovels to help clear the ice of the pesky shavings that can slow players down. These ladies are not all pretty faces and flat stomachs, however. As their bios reveal, most are accomplished figure skaters or hockey players. Maybe someday, women's hockey teams will take a cue from the Avalanche and hire Ice Boys in banana hammocks to wield shovels in the same way.

Tilted Kilt
Britt Chester

Keep your eyes on the TV, no matter how fetching those lasses look in their short kilts and tight shirts. The Tilted Kilt on the 16th Street Mall took over where the ESPN Zone left off. This link in the national chain is a fine place to dig into a plate of Irish nachos, swill a cold beer (or three) and watch the game. Whatever sporting event you're interested in is bound to be on one of the big screens — and on balmy days, you can watch your game while sitting on the patio, which also lets you partake in the great sport of people-watching when there's a break in the on-screen action. Although there are other Kilts in the metro area, the mall-side location tilts this one over the top.

The 1UP Arcade Bar - Colfax

The downtown location of the 1up arcade bar is a cross between Jeff Bridges's Tron arcade and a neighborhood dive. Flashy 8-bit colors and music loops pour out of its 45 vintage arcade games, while geeky bartenders pour craft beers and shots to sate the relentless audience of quarter jockeys night after night. At just a quarter or two a pop, the 1up's finely curated selection of games and pinball machines is as likely to evoke childhood memories as it is to provoke heated challenges between drinking buddies. Thankfully, there's a can of Olde English or an Ectoplasm shot waiting at the bar to settle a dispute or toast an extra life. The arcade never died; it just grew up, got a Dig Dug tattoo and started pounding back PBRs.

Blake Street Tavern

The winner and still the chomp! Blake Street Tavern blew us away last year with its menu, which includes not only sports-bar staples such as burgers, wings and sandwiches, but some of the best green chile in town. And with the addition of the Underground Social, which converted the vast basement space into a big game room with its own bar filled with craft beers alongside the usual bottled suspects, there are more places than ever to score great food and drink. Bonus points for the private rooms, where your group can give Blake Street's dishes — and, yes, the sporting events on its big TVs — the attention they deserve.

ViewHouse Ballpark

Remember when you and your friends used to hang in the back yard, running through the sprinkler, playing flag football or Wiffle ball, or just kicking a rock around? Even though you're a big kid now, those good times are still within reach: When summer heats up, the ViewHouse opens its own back yard every Sunday for outdoor games that are nothing but fun, including everything from volleyball to tooth-and-nail water fights, only with grownup refreshments. Feeling more serious about hitting a ball over a net? Stay tuned for weeknight volleyball leagues, also starting up this summer.

Chatfield State Park

Are you tired of the packed-in feel of small dog parks, and the same forced questions from well-meaning fellow dog lovers: Is it a boy or a girl? What's his name? How old is she? If so, then escape to the Westminster Dog Park, 420 acres of off-leash open space where you and your best friend can wander the empty landscape. In the summer, gather around a pond, throw sticks and balls and let your dog cool off in the water; in the winter, ski, snowshoe and sled alongside Fido. You'll both be worn out afterward.

Stapleton Dog Park

Looking for love? Forget OKCupid and the bars. Get your pooch (or borrow one) and head to Stapleton Dog Park. The chatty dog lovers who congregate here in droves are friendly and flirty and seem plenty willing to hand out their phone numbers. If you're lucky, you just might meet someone who's looking to share a poop-scooping LTR.

Downtown Aquarium

You might think swimming with sharks would be a tall order in a landlocked state like Colorado. But the Downtown Aquarium — housing more than a million gallons of water in the heart of the city — has you covered. For $185, certified scuba divers can sign up to plunge into the aquarium's "Sunken Shipwreck" exhibit and get up close and personal with several species of sharks, as well as sea turtles, guitarfish (which look kinda like a cross between a shark and a ray) and barracudas. As a bonus, the fee includes a "Dive With the Sharks" T-shirt and a free appetizer at the aquarium's restaurant. (The Downtown Aquarium is actually owned by Landry's Restaurants, which bought it in 2003.) Who needs an ocean when you can have complimentary beef sliders?

Fishing might not be the first thing that comes to mind when Denverites think of the South Platte River. Pollution, maybe. Or used condoms. But the river that winds through the Mile High City is more than most people give it credit for, especially when it comes to stalking big-ass fish. In recent years, fly-fishing the South Platte for carp has become increasingly popular; there's even an annual Carp Slam fly-fishing tournament hosted by the Denver chapter of Trout Unlimited. Carp are resilient freshwater fish that can grow to nearly 100 pounds, and they're plentiful in the South Platte. That doesn't mean they're easy to catch, though: They're excellent at avoiding fishermen's hooks, which makes reeling one in that much more of an accomplishment.

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