Best Flea Market
Danielle Lirette

Amy and Doug Yetman began honing their skills in the flea-market biz with the Horseshoe Craft and Flea Market, which first popped up in a Berkeley neighborhood parking lot in 2010. As other hip flea markets came and went, they managed to stay people-friendly and stick to their original mission of being the place for "lucky finds," picking up numerous Best of Denver awards in the process. Now they're preparing for their tenth season, continuing to stretch in both size and location, and this year will involve the biggest change of all: a move to Mile High Stadium's spacious Lot G, where the first market of 2019 will open over Mother's Day weekend with 200 vendors over two days. Go and get lucky!

horseshoemarket.com

Readers' Choice: Mile High Flea Market

Tucked behind storefronts along South Sheridan Boulevard is a veritable gold mine of secondhand clothing, shoes, furniture and decor. Mile High Thrift is a bare-bones spot; there are no dressing rooms, and sales are cash-only. But the clothing — organized by style and then by color — is a good mix of newer trends and vintage items, restocked often enough that it doesn't seem picked over. The shoe section is neat, with deep racks, and the furniture appears curated rather than just thrown off the back of someone's truck. Get there early, grab a shopping cart and start hunting.

Readers' Choice: Arc Thrift Store

Rags wheels and deals in gently used better and designer brands at its Boulder and Cherry Creek North locations, but what happens to the perfectly good fashions that hang on the racks too long at those upscale resale shops? They get a second chance. Everything in the roomy Rags Consignment Warehouse is marked down by 20 percent, making for easy pickin's on a budget.

Sandy's Closet swears by quality, stocking its racks with barely worn, better-brand clothing at prices that look attractive whether you're looking to dress up or down. The inventory includes jewelry, accessories, bags, shoes and a cheaper-than-cheap one-dollar bin for impulse buyers. Ease your conscience as you fill up a sack or two with the knowledge that proceeds from sales benefit special-needs and intellectually disabled children.

Self-proclaimed merchant Katie Jones wanted to put a modern, global face on Bazar, her LoHi boutique whose name refers to the international bazaars where local, one-of-a-kind goods are sold on the street. The look that Bazar purveys follows the same course: It's easy, hip and classic, but a little bit exotic, too, with well-made and ecologically sound apparel ranging from basic denim to leopard-skin booties. Tone up your look.

Jammers gotta jam, and their jammy fans need proper boho/tribal gowns and duds for all the noodle-dancing and such. And then there's the Burner crowd, which requires its own avant-garde brand of festival wear. Now there's a place to find both. Owner Jesse "Jucifer" Taenzer, who's been hanging out at Cervantes' since he was fifteen, works with mostly local designer/artists, so everything on the racks at Pair O' Dimes is handmade, unique and off the charts. Hankering to channel your inner Stevie Nicks at Red Rocks or dance on the desert in a many-colored pagan costume? Whatever. Pair O' Dimes has you covered.

Nonconformist? Vintage boutique Midnight Rambler has opened up its East Colfax space to other like-minded businesses, resulting in an entrepreneurial shack-up with a lot to offer to folks like you living the boho lifestyle. The Collective within includes home decor by Bungalow Design, clothes for kids by Lilly & Rae, jewelry by Hiouchi and, for fresh ambience, bouquet design by Rooted Floral, making it the perfect place to shop when you want to add items to your free-spirited closet and living space.

Handmade limited-edition bags, from coin purses and wristlets to oversized vacation totes, are the staple at Gypsy Souls, a travel-themed boutique for people on the go, but warm hats, easy jewelry and casual tees with nomadic messages are also in the mix, urging the kick-back crowd to take to the road. Local is also a theme at the shop, which prefers to peddle sweatshop-free, eco-conscious goods from Colorado makers.

"Great Sand Dunes"
G. Roslie
"Great Sand Dunes"

Like all slow movements, slow fashion focuses on mindfulness about where products come from and how they are made, an idea not lost on Ry and G. Roslie, the husband-and-wife maker/proprietors of Slo Curio, a RiNo boutique that invites you to better appreciate craftsmanship, design and eco-conscious materials. G. makes relaxed clothing from hand-dyed natural fabrics, while Ry is a handyman and artist with a sense of style, creating design-forward hanging lamps and other functional artworks. Together they stock their own shop, with help from friends and makers of their ilk. Walking into Slo Curio is like drinking a tall, cool cocktail on a summer day — made with local ingredients, of course.

Where do contemporary swing dancers find their old-fashioned, twentieth-century finery? You can spend your life searching vintage shops and websites for a perfect 1940s fashion statement in your size and color, or you can order up freshly sewn, hand-finished dresses, skirts and trousers from Swingbird Fashions, the creation of a Finnish seamstress (and a swing dancer herself) now living and working in Colorado. Get ready to swing your partner.

etsy.com/shop/SwingbirdFashions

@swingbirdfashions

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