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Reader: Thirty States With MMJ Programs, but How Many Are Functional?

Reader: Thirty States With MMJ Programs, but How Many Are Functional?
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On June 26, Oklahoma became the thirtieth state in the country to legalize marijuana for medical purposes. Question 788 passed with 57 percent approval and is being lauded by MMJ advocates for its wide-ranging provisions; unlike the majority of states with MMJ programs (including Colorado), Oklahoma will allow doctors to recommend marijuana for any condition they see fit.

What a difference four years makes! In 2014, Oklahoma and Nebraska were suing Colorado in federal court for this state's decision to legalize recreational marijuana, but now the Sooner State is starting to catch up with Colorado's affinity for the plant — and someday might even surpass it. But then, former Oklahoma attorney general Scott Pruitt, who pushed the lawsuit, is now busy racking up personal expenses as head of the EPA.

Readers were quick to weight in. Says John: 

Our time has come, boys.

Adds Fitz:

 Screw Oklahoma. All red states suck! I hope those Okies stay outta here. Including draft picks.

Responds Mitchell: 

Yeah, that's why CU wants back in the big twelve?

Rhonda brings the focus back to the issue: 

Thirty states with legal MMJ. How many are functional? I know some can't seem to get it up and running. They are tripping on their own feet.

Keep reading for more of our coverage of the Oklahoma case.

Reader: Thirty States With MMJ Programs, but How Many Are Functional?
Jacqueline Collins

"Oklahoma Legalized Medical Marijuana, to the Likely Dismay of Scott Pruitt"

Reader: Thirty States With MMJ Programs, but How Many Are Functional?
YouTube


"Feds Side With Colorado Over Nebraska, Oklahoma in Supreme Court Pot Lawsuit"

Reader: Thirty States With MMJ Programs, but How Many Are Functional?
YouTube

"Some Oklahoma Conservatives Decry Federal Pot Lawsuit Against Colorado"

Back in 2004, Pruitt took issue with the Obama administration for "not enforcing federal drug law" in allowing the sale of legal marijuana in the neighboring state of Colorado.

However, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the lawsuit in 2015, and in early 2017 President Donald Trump elevated Pruitt to administrator of the EPA — and a target for probes into Pruitt's lavish spending habits. Oklahoma is currently waiting to elect a new AG, with just one major candidate (interim AG Mike Hunter) publicly opposing the legalization of MMJ.

What do you think of the current state of legal MMJ? How is Colorado's program doing? Post your thoughts in a comment, or email marijuana@westword.com.

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