Reader: How Much Money Has Been Wasted Going After Sweet Leaf?
Westword

Reader: How Much Money Has Been Wasted Going After Sweet Leaf?

While Sweat Leaf is in the midst of a hearing to see if its 26 pot-related licenses will be restored or rescinded for good by the City of Denver, fifteen budtenders who were arrested as a result of the December 14 raid await trial, on charges related to selling more than an ounce a day to certain customers — including undercover police officers — who looped in for multiple purchases in a day. But as Amendment 64 was originally passed, consumers were limited to one ounce "per transaction." That language was amended to indicate that the intention was possession of one ounce per day...but that change only took hold on January 1, 2018, after the raids and arrests.

Our readers continue to weigh in on the case. Says Nicholson: 

Should arrest the undercover police for breaking the law!

Responds Karen:  

I don't think these people should go to jail. However. Yes, they were helping people carry more than 1 ounce. Any other coy answer is insulting.

Adds Michael: 

How much taxpayer money has been wasted in going after Sweet Leaf? How much money will the state lose in taxes collected?

Says Mike: 

Victimless crimes are not crimes. Google "Jury Nullification."

Concludes Dan: 

Victimless crimes are easy money.

Keep reading for more of our coverage of the Sweet Leaf raids.

Reader: How Much Money Has Been Wasted Going After Sweet Leaf? (4)
Scott Lentz

"How One Word Could Change Denver's Sweet Leaf Prosecution"

Reader: How Much Money Has Been Wasted Going After Sweet Leaf? (3)
Scott Lentz

"Sweet Leaf Moving Ahead With New Thornton Store"

Reader: How Much Money Has Been Wasted Going After Sweet Leaf? (5)
Scott Lentz

"Sweet Leaf Raids Cast Shadow Over Pot Industry"

On March 14, hearing officer Suzanne Fasing began hearing testimony regarding the city's suspension of all Sweet Leaf licenses after the Denver Police Department and other state and local law enforcement agencies raided eight of the company's dispensaries. The hearing was supposed to take two days, but it's already been extended to include testimony on March 19 and March 20.

Appearing in a Denver Department of Excise and Licenses hearing room, lawyers representing Sweet Leaf defended the company from allegations that it had enabled illegal cannabis purchases by customers. The raids came after a year of investigating alleged looping, or selling unlawful amounts of cannabis to customers, at Sweet Leaf stores, according to the Denver District Attorney's Office.

For the better part of two days, DPD detective Aaron Kafer provided extensive recordings of police officers making repeated undercover purchases at Sweet Leaf. But all of those sales were made before the language of the law changed on January 1.

What do you think should happen to the Sweet Leaf licenses? To the fifteen budtenders who've been charged? Post your thoughts in a comment, or email editorial@westword.com.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send: