Concerts

John Fogerty, Ludacris and the Strangest Concerts in Denver This Weekend


It's the weekend, and we all have "Get Weird" scrawled at the top of our to-do lists. But beyond the usual hijinks and bad bar-mitvah dancing you're applying to dance floors all over Denver, here are three concerts this weekend that are truly strange. 

1. On Saturday, September 10, there's a music festival happening at a distillery, Mile High Spirits Distillery and Tasting Bar. And that music festival features four intermittent sets throughout the day by one DJ, the Denver-based marathon man Mikey Thunder. And that music festival features Ludacris as a headliner. Yes, Ludacris, the onetime ubiquitous rapper and now philanthropist, restaurateur and cognac-maker. This music festival's name is the Punching Mule Music Festival, named for the sponsor, a company that makes a vodka-based, "can-crafted" Moscow Mule. Take it all in.


2. John Fogerty, the man who wrote the 1969 hit "Fortunate Son," one of the best songs criticizing militant patriotic behavior, is headlining the Colorado Remember 9/11 free show in Civic Center Park on Sunday, September 11, with programming starting at 1 p.m.


3. Has your brunch gone stale? Austin musician Dale Watson is bringing his long-running "Chicken Shit Bingo" show to La Rumba on Sunday, September 11. In addition to live honky-tonk music and dancing, there's also bingo, which, according to the event description, involves "a caged hen strutting across a plywood board divided into numbered squares while betting customers gather ’round the cage, hoping the bird will drop its mark on their chosen numeral." There will be cash prizes. 

So go on, music lovers. Quit your head-scratching, embrace Denver's contradictions, and keep this evolving cowtown weird.
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