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Bondage & Domination

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"Barmore and Dog are playing two sides of the fence," says Gary Glennon. "They're friends with everyone, then they run to Jolene."

"They made me change sides," Barmore responds. "I was dating Duane, and they said I was sleeping with the enemy and they no longer trusted me.

"At first I thought what both sides were doing was wrong," she continues. "But I realized Jolene was just trying to make a living. They're just trying to be greedy."

The next confrontation came on Sunday, January 14, 1998, when Martinez, Chapman and Barmore attended a meeting of the Colorado Bail Agents Association (CBAA). The organization was meeting to discuss legislation regarding bounty-hunter training and licensing that it's sponsoring through its lobbyist, Freda Poundstone.

The scene of the meeting was Poundstone's luxury home in suburban Greenwood Village. The surly tone, however, came straight from Bail Bond Row. Things got testy when Dave Hyatt, a former bondsman and vice president of an insurance company that underwrites many of the bonds written in Denver, took a seat directly behind the Martinez contingent.

"I don't want anybody sitting behind me," Dog told Hyatt.
According to Martinez, Hyatt fired back, "Say anything to me and I'll come down on you with both feet." (Hyatt says he left before the meeting even began, and he refuses to comment on what happened while he was there.)

Things got more contentious as the evening wore on, with verbal tirades coming from both sides. At one point someone called the police, and the other bondsmen tried to get Chapman thrown out. Poundstone, however, canceled the police request before any officers showed up.

"Freda came back and told everybody to shut up," Martinez says. "She went on to do the meeting. Freda started talking about the bill. It was so good to listen to her. Everyone apologized at the end."

The next day, January 15, a block meeting was held on the Row. Martinez came for a few minutes but, feeling that the odds were against her, soon split. However, she had a plan to uncover what she suspected was a plot against her: She left behind a friend, bondsman Granville Lee, to tape the meeting and report back. (Lee did not return phone calls from Westword.)

When Lee had to stop recording to turn the tape over, he was found out. Other bondsmen angrily told him to shut the machine off. He told them he had but instead kept on recording.

On the tape, the bondsmen can be heard comparing Martinez's undercutting to, well, treason.

"You know, these guys worked very hard to get 15 percent," says an outraged Pollack. "You can't take it away from them. Just like our forefathers fought a war for our freedom. For God's sakes, there was people fighting for this 15 percent for this industry. How can you turn 'em backwards like that?"

Soon after, the group gets down to specifics about how to deal with Martinez:

Pollack: "Everybody's lost it. So [Rourke] says today, 'I'm gonna do 7 1/2 percent down.'"

Dave Widhalm: "Finally, someone got fed up."
Pollack: "Got pissed off. Had it up to here. Can't blame him."
Rourke: "Least I went and told everybody."

Pollack: "And he did. He had the courtesy to tell us and get us in a tizzy. So then Red says, 'Hell, he's right next to me. I'm going down to 9 percent flat.' I said, 'Well, fuck that, I'll put 8 percent.' Red said, 'Then I'll put 8 percent.' 'Well, then, I'll put 7.' 'Well, I'll put...' I said, 'Let's just stop right there. We aren't gonna fight, either. We're gonna figure out a solution.'"

Spensieri: "I already got the solution...We all go to 10 percent and compete on her level for three months. She's gone."

Later on the tape, Spensieri lets loose. "You know everybody had the signs," he says, referring to the price-cutting war started by Martinez. "Fuck that, I ain't doing it! I'll starve alone. I ain't gonna sacrifice my ass. I'll blow that building up before I'll starve."

After the block meeting, Spensieri, Lee and another bondsmen were sent to deliver terms to Martinez: If she didn't take her signs down, the others would go down to 9 percent. Before the three emissaries left the meeting, Spensieri once again cracked wise, this time saying that he might toss a Molotov cocktail through Martinez's window.

"Everybody says a lot of different things," says Spensieri of his comments at the meeting. "I'll just keep to myself."

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T.R. Witcher