Longform

Bondage & Domination

Page 5 of 5

"They got there with a horrible attitude," says Pollack of her foes. "Before the meeting was called to order, they were making complaints." When the association decided to oust them as members, she says, the trio made threats and even hit a couple of people.

Jack Tanksley, a friend of Martinez's who also serves as the regional representative for the nonprofit Professional Bail Agents of the United States, says the threats came from Pollack's side. "There were big guys there, and I don't know if they were muscle or what," he says, "but they looked like they were ready for a fight."

But Glennon says Martinez and Chapman started it. "The first thing out of [Dog's] mouth was an argument with Dave Widhalm," he says. "Jolene threatened Mary Ellen. Then Mary Ellen fired off a few words." (Widhalm declined to comment for this story.)

Some shoving followed, Glennon recalls, and the 10-percenters were finally pushed out the front door: "That's where it started, and that's where it ended."

Outside, Martinez and Chapman claim, they were maced. Once again, police officers were called to the scene. This time they didn't issue any tickets.

"They wanted to shoot us, not just kick us out," Martinez says of the altercation. What the 15ers did instead was go to court and ask for temporary restraining orders against Martinez and Chapman. In their request filed with the court, they referred to the meeting at Glennon's shop in this way: "The association voted to expel Jolene Martinez, Duane Chapman and Alice Barmore for prior threats of bodily harm and murder at which time they threatened and began assaulting association members."

Even worse, association members claimed in the request for the restraining orders, was the January 14 meeting at Freda Poundstone's house. At that meeting, they told the court, Martinez and company "threatened bodily injury to members of CBAA. The above named have continued to threaten bodily harm and to kill members of CBAA."

The initial request to prohibit Martinez and company from setting foot in the county jail or the courthouse--which, from a bail bondsman's point of view, would be sort of like barring a teacher from entering a classroom--was rejected. But the court did prohibit Martinez and the others from coming within 100 yards of four bond houses on the 1300 block of Delaware and from coming within 100 yards of no less than eighteen named individuals.

On February 27, attorney Chanin filed a counterclaim arguing that Pollack and company had the "ulterior purpose and motive...to harass and intimidate Martinez."

On Thursday, March 5, a settlement was reached, and the restraining orders against Jolene and Jerry Martinez, Duane Chapman and Alice Barmore were dismissed. Both sides claimed victory. The celebration was shortlived. Moments after leaving the courtroom, the foursome ran into Dave Widhalm Jr., a 22-year-old complete with red mohawk and black leather jacket.

The foursome swear they said nothing to Widhalm as he passed them on the way out. D.J. recalls otherwise. "They said 'There's that punk's kid,'" he says. "One of 'em said, 'Let's kick his ass.' Another said, 'We need to kick his ass.'" If Barmore hadn't pulled Chapman back, he adds, he doesn't know what would have happened.

Police technician Randall Smith, who issued Chapman and Jerry Martinez tickets for threatening to injure a person or damage property, says security guards heard loud voices but no threats, so it's Widhalm's word against those of the others. The alleged municipal-ordinance violations were added to the growing list of cases now crowding the legal system as a result of the Battle of Bail Bond Row.

"When a person wants to make a complaint, unless we have some reason to negate it, we have to adjudicate it through the courts," says Officer Smith. A hearing in the case is scheduled for April 16.

The Row has been quiet of late. Martinez is still nervous about the unidentified photographer who's been snapping pictures of her office, but other than that, things seem to have calmed down. Dog is spending most of his time these days entertaining a writer who says he wants to write a screenplay about his life.

Everyone on the Row speaks of putting things behind them. They say they don't care about the competition. But Martinez's friend Tanksley figures the tension will continue for a while. "It'll end," he says. "They'll get enough bad publicity, and they'll cut their own throat.

KEEP WESTWORD FREE... Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
T.R. Witcher