Longform

BRUCE'S GENEROUS PALS

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Kohler didn't fare any better with political appointments. Three years ago he was nominated to serve on the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin. The state senate rejected him, the first senate rejection of the position in nearly two decades. A possible reason: Kohler had angered people by referring to gays as "queers" and by saying in 1991 that giving blacks the vote in South Africa would be "a disaster."

Other Benson supporters have had their professional paths nicely paved, too. Peter Kellogg donated a whopping $50,000 to Benson's campaign in June. ("I'm a Democrat," says Kellogg, reached at his New York offices. "I support him because I think Bruce is a terrific guy." Memo to Roy Romer: "I'd probably support him, too, if he asked.")

Kellogg is a principal of the Wall Street firm of Spear, Leeds and Kellogg, one of the most successful specialist firms on the New York Stock Exchange. But that's not Peter's name on the door. Rather, it's the name of his father, James, who served on the Port Authority of New York, joined the firm in 1941 and was added as a name partner in 1958.

Several significant local contributors to Benson, while successful, have started out with a good-size lead from the rest of the pack. Timothy Travis, who owns Eaton Metal Products Co., has given Benson a total of $8,000 in three installments this spring and summer. Travis joined Eaton Metal in 1963 immediately after he graduated from George Washington High School. He is the grandson of the man who bought a controlling interest in the metal manufacturing company in the mid-1940s.

No one doubts that Bo Callaway is a rich and successful businessman. But he was never handicapped by poverty--or even middle income--at the beginning. Callaway, former Secretary of the Army, recently returned to his home in Pine Mountain, Georgia, where he oversees Callaway Gardens, a 350-room resort created by his parents.

end of part 1

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Eric Dexheimer
Contact: Eric Dexheimer