Commentary

Letters

Page 3 of 3

Robert Carney
via the Internet

The Clash of Symbols
I am writing in response to Michael Roberts's July 9 review of Rancid's Life Won't Wait. Roberts is entitled to his own opinion, which is fine, but I think his review was rather snobbish. "Back in 1978, when this band was called the Clash and this album was called Give 'Em Enough Rope..."--I think that section was uncalled for. So what if they sound like the Clash? That's not a bad thing at all. The Clash were great. Most punk bands that are around now wouldn't exist if it weren't for the Clash. Also, saying that Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Topper Hendon and Paul Simonon are now known as Tim Armstrong, Lars Fredrikson, Matt Freeman and Brett Reed is just fucked up. I think calling "Bloodclot" a "raveup/football chant" is out of line. The "hey-ho"s were provided by Marky Ramone of the Ramones, who are legends and the originators of today's punk sound. I don't think Rancid is accessible enough for any of the band's songs to be a "raveup/football chant." I think they "upped their originality quotient" considerably with this record.

(P.S. At least Rancid is fighting racism rather than writing closed-minded reviews of CDs.)

Lee Pietrus
Denver

The Power and the Glory
Your Glory series rules! Too bad you haven't been printing the pictures in the paper as well as putting them on the Web. Everyone should see this!

Death to Beanie Babies!
Joe Haker
via the Internet

The July 30 addition to your Beanie Baby brutalization was extremely out of line ("Bound--and Gagged--for Glory," at www.westword.com). While your site generally provides entertainment/humor for adults, in this particular case (because you are using a very popular toy), you have children as young as seven and eight following along. Your article about torturing Glory was already teetering on tasteless at some moments but was nonetheless quite funny at others, even to children. Your series has been linked to many of the popular Beanie Baby sites, and therefore is accessed by many children.

While I'm quite sure that you intended this series to be targeted for adults from the beginning, it is negligent of you to not realize that this market is mostly made up of children. When I checked out your "Gory, Glory" this morning for further developments, I was appalled by the language, the theme, the photos, the reference to the adult-merchandise store. Do you have any idea how many children will also be checking this out?

I do realize that "shock factor" is one of the main attributes of your paper's site in general and do not oppose this when being viewed by the audience it is intended for--adults. I think that you should seriously consider redoing the current installment in the Glory series. You have stepped far over the boundary on this one, given the viewing audience. Your writers were irresponsible on this one. It is your responsibility to present what is appropriate for what you have started with "Gory, Glory."

Lisa
via the Internet

Editor's note: Don't worry, the fun's almost over. Watch our Beanie Baby go out in a blaze of Glory on www.westword.com.

Letters policy: Westword wants to hear from you, whether you have a complaint or compliment about what we write from week to week. Letters should be no more than 200 words; we reserve the right to edit for libel, length and clarity. Although we'll occasionally withhold an author's name on request, all letters must include your name, address and telephone number. Write to:

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