Lists

Most Surprising Concessions From the 2019 Teachers’ Strike

Teaching ain't all books and apples, people.
Teaching ain't all books and apples, people. Matthew at Flickr

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Civics class should not be this sweaty. - KENNETH FREEMAN AT FLICKR
Civics class should not be this sweaty.
Kenneth Freeman at Flickr
3. All Classrooms Must Have Air Conditioning
Because global warming is a thing, and science classes at public schools still teach science as though it were, you know, science. Locally, what that means is that when school is wrapping up in May and June, and especially when it starts up again in August, classrooms can be stifling. Air conditioning for all!


4. Everyone Has to Stop Saying That Teachers Get Summers Off

This would only be an effective line of reasoning if teachers were to get paid for those summer-break months — which are closer to two than three, by the way. Most teachers see it as both a perk and a curse; sure, it's nice to have some downtime, but would you want two and a half months of unpaid mandatory time off every year? Could your budget support that? Or would you, like most educators who aren't in a dual-income household with a comfortable standard of living, have to find another source of income to make ends meet? There’s a reason that Casa Bonita cliff diver looks familiar — because he’s also Señor Jonny from Spanish class.

click to enlarge The Teacher's Lounge: where no one ever has to be ashamed of their collectible lunchbox. - MIKEY WALTERS AT FLICKR
The Teacher's Lounge: where no one ever has to be ashamed of their collectible lunchbox.
Mikey Walters at Flickr
5. Bring Back the Teacher's Lounge
And coffee urns. Couches and stuffed chairs. Occasional doughnuts on Fridays, a fridge, a sink and an attached bathroom to which students don't have access. This isn't about having a place to light up a menthol and spike the coffee in your plaid Thermos. Rather, it's about having a respectable place in which teachers could gather...no matter what's in anyone’s plaid Thermos.

click to enlarge When you said "old school," you meant old school. - ROB SHENK AT FLICKR
When you said "old school," you meant old school.
Rob Shenk at Flickr
6. Parents Must Attend Mandatory "Your Child Is Not Your Friend" Training Before Contacting Any Teacher With Complaints or Pedagogical Advice
This is pretty much self-explanatory.

click to enlarge 1891: before helicopter parents were invented. Because helicopters weren't invented. - AUSSIE-MOBS AT FLICKR
1891: before helicopter parents were invented. Because helicopters weren't invented.
Aussie-Mobs at Flickr
7. Forget that: Parents May Not Offer Pedagogical Advice
And so is this.


8. Superintendent Visits Must Be Announced

At least three days in advance, please. Also, they must wear a bell around their necks at all times and hand out candy bars.

click to enlarge It can be tough to find those stickers from 2007. - MIKE MCCULLOUGH AT FLICKR
It can be tough to find those stickers from 2007.
Mike McCullough at Flickr
9. The District Must Provide All Supplies
Paper, pens, erasers, rulers, books, notebooks. Colored chalk, because it’s fun. And plenty of those smiley-face “Great job!” stickers, too. Actually, just some petty cash would be good; the district won’t know where to find the cool stickers.

That's definitely a teacher's shirt, and it definitely has short sleeves. - SAM FELDER AT FLICKR
That's definitely a teacher's shirt, and it definitely has short sleeves.
Sam Felder at Flickr
10. Election Day: Also a School Holiday
What better way to teach kids that being a good citizen in this country starts with the right — and responsibility — to vote? Power to the people, Denver. Power to the people.
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Teague Bohlen is a writer, novelist and professor at the University of Colorado Denver. His first novel, The Pull of the Earth, won the Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction in 2007; his textbook The Snarktastic Guide to College Success came out in 2014. His new collection of flash fiction, Flatland, is available now.
Contact: Teague Bohlen