Sub.mission Is Taking Over Quixote's, Replacing Deadheads With Bassheads

Quixote's True Blue hosted its last jam-centric shows this weekend.
Quixote's True Blue hosted its last jam-centric shows this weekend.
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In a post announcing the closing of Quixote's True Blue at the end of October, owner Jay Bianchi described the venue "as sort of a refuge for Deadheads..." It's a sad day for the loners of Shakedown Street. But what was once a refuge for Deadheads will now be a refuge for bassheads: Nicole Cacciavillano and her Sub.mission Dubstep brand have purchased the venue. Starting on Tuesday, November 1, the iconic East 13th Avenue venue will be called the Black Box, a venue devoted to Sub.mission's aim of moving people through sound, not hype.

Cacciavillano said this has been in the works since March, but she has worked tirelessly to keep it under wraps. And it's not the first venue she's tried to purchase. Years back, there was talk of acquiring City Hall alongside Cervantes', but that plan never came to fruition.

"Where I am with my career, that venue space is perfect," Cacciavillano says. And by perfect, she means perfect for the sound system and vibe she will create inside.

Sub.mission's Nicole Cacciavillano is teaching Denver how to dubstep.
Sub.mission's Nicole Cacciavillano is teaching Denver how to dubstep.
Westword archive

It all makes sense, since the building now housing Quixote's was one of the first venues where she delivered a proper dubstep show, in 2007 (the very first venue was the now-defunct Kazmo's on Kalamath Street). Before Bianchi acquired the space in 2012, it was known as Bender's Tavern. This spot at 314 East 13th had hosted a spectrum of clubs, and at the time was most recognizable by its east-facing mural of Johnny Cash. Jerry Garcia replaced Cash when the venue became Quixote's. Will Skream replace Garcia? Maybe Mala? Benga? Hatcha? A mural devoted to dubstep pioneers?

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In 2007, Sub.mission brought out Hatcha and Benga to play Bender's. As Cacciavillano recalls, "Bender's was the first venue to let me bring a sound system in," which was for the Hatcha and Benga show, so she sees this as everything really just coming full circle for Sub.mission.

She said she plans to paint everything black. All the walls. The counters. The ceilings. Everything. For anyone who has been following Sub.mission for the past nine years, this blackout is in keeping with its, well, mission. The whole credo for the dubstep crew has been "Moving people through sound, not hype," so the frilly club shit you find dangling and tacked to the walls of other places will be, thankfully, not included.

This venue will be about proper dubstep: low-end frequencies and high-caliber talent. "I can't wait to see Skrillex at the Black Box!" is a phrase you will never hear.

Although the Deadheads will now have to noodle on to another venue, they are being replaced by a new generation of devoted music fans who, like Deadheads, know the difference between the way things are and the way things should be.

Sub.mission has sold out nearly every venue in Denver and the surrounding metro area without bending to the hype. We look forward to seeing what it does with this long-running Capitol Hill space.

The first Sub.mission-produced show in the space is set for November 19, with Mala, Kahn, Neek and MORESOUNDS. According to a Facebook post by Sub.mission, the space will feature two rooms with state-of-the-art sound by Basscouch.

This post will be updated with more information as it is received.

Eprom performing at Quixote's.
Eprom performing at Quixote's.
Westword archive

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