In the best of all worlds, a team mascot should represent the players and inspire them at their game. When you think Division I college football players, what comes to mind? Exactly -- huge, muscular, hairy, dangerous, and perhaps just a little bit rank. If you're going to grind out a come-from-behind victory in the closing minutes, it's unlikely to be inspired by looking to a bat-wielding dinosaur or a stuffed...whatever, with a bolt of lightning exiting his buttocks. No -- if you want motivation, you turn to a thundering bunched-muscle quadruped named Ralphie. A minor note: Ralphie's mojo doesn't seem to work that well indoors for the Buffs' men's hoopsters. But on the grass, he kicks.
The Avs might win their second Stanley Cup in five years, and the Broncos did achieve a back-to-back, but the real sports dynasty resides a couple of hundred miles west of Denver, in Glitter Gulch. The Gentlemen of Aspen first started winning USA Rugby Club championships in 1997, and they haven't stopped since. This year they'll be trying for five national titles in a row, which would tie with the all-time best. Did we mention that they practice in a horse barn, tackling one another on ground that may have horsebleep left on it? That's dedication.

The Avs might win their second Stanley Cup in five years, and the Broncos did achieve a back-to-back, but the real sports dynasty resides a couple of hundred miles west of Denver, in Glitter Gulch. The Gentlemen of Aspen first started winning USA Rugby Club championships in 1997, and they haven't stopped since. This year they'll be trying for five national titles in a row, which would tie with the all-time best. Did we mention that they practice in a horse barn, tackling one another on ground that may have horsebleep left on it? That's dedication.

Even without Elway, there were plenty of glorious memories coming out of Mile High Stadium. And for those who wanted to bask in a sure thing -- the glow of past glories -- Denver provided one last chance. After all, many Broncos boosters were never able to afford tickets to games at Mile High, and few of those who could ever got the chance to visit any part of the stadium other than their seats, the concession stands and the long bathroom lines. So let us now praise the city's decision to open the Denver-owned facility to free farewell tours through the first two months of 2001, thereby giving locals of every economic level the chance to check out the locker rooms, luxury boxes and even the field itself before they're reduced to dust.

Even without Elway, there were plenty of glorious memories coming out of Mile High Stadium. And for those who wanted to bask in a sure thing -- the glow of past glories -- Denver provided one last chance. After all, many Broncos boosters were never able to afford tickets to games at Mile High, and few of those who could ever got the chance to visit any part of the stadium other than their seats, the concession stands and the long bathroom lines. So let us now praise the city's decision to open the Denver-owned facility to free farewell tours through the first two months of 2001, thereby giving locals of every economic level the chance to check out the locker rooms, luxury boxes and even the field itself before they're reduced to dust.

The University of Denver Pioneers had a mediocre season, but sophomore goaltender Wade Dubielewicz is widely regarded as a potential All-American. In his first 27 games this year, he gave up just 2.19 goals per game -- sixth in the nation and first among goalies in the tough Western Collegiate Hockey Association. The Invermere, British Columbia, native is just 5'10" and 178 pounds, but his incredible quickness and great glove hand make him impenetrable. If the moneybags of the NHL don't come calling too soon, he might lead the Pioneers back to the heights.
The University of Denver Pioneers had a mediocre season, but sophomore goaltender Wade Dubielewicz is widely regarded as a potential All-American. In his first 27 games this year, he gave up just 2.19 goals per game -- sixth in the nation and first among goalies in the tough Western Collegiate Hockey Association. The Invermere, British Columbia, native is just 5'10" and 178 pounds, but his incredible quickness and great glove hand make him impenetrable. If the moneybags of the NHL don't come calling too soon, he might lead the Pioneers back to the heights.
Since late last year, a portion of the world's largest collection of dinosaur tracks has been housed in a church basement. University of Colorado paleontologist Martin Lockley spenty twenty years making molds of dinosaur tracks from around the world; today the collection spans more than 300 million years. In addition to big, big footprints, the small, below-ground museum also features an interactive computer display and re-creations of a foot skeleton and the skull of a Tyrannosaurus rex; other items from Lockley's print collection are housed upstairs in St. Cajetan's as well as in rooms across campus.
Since late last year, a portion of the world's largest collection of dinosaur tracks has been housed in a church basement. University of Colorado paleontologist Martin Lockley spenty twenty years making molds of dinosaur tracks from around the world; today the collection spans more than 300 million years. In addition to big, big footprints, the small, below-ground museum also features an interactive computer display and re-creations of a foot skeleton and the skull of a Tyrannosaurus rex; other items from Lockley's print collection are housed upstairs in St. Cajetan's as well as in rooms across campus.
After being convicted of conspiracy in the murder of his pregnant girlfriend, Cherica Adams, former University of Colorado and Carolina Panthers wide receiver Rae Carruth went on television to tell his side of the story -- which included the claim that he was barely acquainted with the victim, apart from their encounters in the bedroom. Said Carruth: "I didn't even know her last name until we went to Lamaze class."

Best Of Denver®

Best Of