Denver Development

Tallest Buildings in Denver — and the New Addition That Just Broke Ground

A rendering of what the 1900 Lawrence project will look like when completed.
A rendering of what the 1900 Lawrence project will look like when completed. 1900lawrence.com
A new addition to the Denver skyline is on the way, thanks to this week's groundbreaking for the thirty-story 1900 Lawrence Project, which is slated for completion in 2024.

According to 9News,1900 Lawrence will be the tallest office tower to be built in downtown Denver in more than forty years. But that's a debatable assertion: The building at 1144 15th Street, whose construction got underway in 2015 and finished up in 2018, was touted as achieving this same benchmark, and it's forty stories.

Still, there's no denying that the new edifice will have some spectacular accoutrements. A release about the project, which was designed by Chicago-based Goettsch Partners and Denver's Shears Adkins Rockmore Architects, highlights "state-of-the-art office space, expansive ceiling heights and highly efficient rectilinear floorplates with floor-to-ceiling glass, multiple floors with private tenant terraces, and unparalleled views of the Front Range, Coors Field, LoDo and Skyline Park."

The following rendering provides a preview of how 1900 Lawrence will fit in with its surroundings:
As the image above indicates, 1900 Lawrence won't come close to topping the Wikipedia list of Denver's tallest buildings. Its height is estimated at approximately 428 feet, which would put it in fifteenth place on the roster. And even Denver's tallest building — the 56-story, 717-foot Republic Plaza, which was completed in 1984 — is overshadowed by others that truly scrape the sky across the country; it only ranks 137th on that list.

Here are Denver's 25 tallest buildings, complete with height, number of stories and the year of completion.

1. Republic Plaza (370 17th Street)
714 feet
56 stories
1984

2. 1801 California
709 feet
53 stories
1983

3. Wells Fargo Center (1700 Lincoln Street)
640 feet
45 stories
1983

4. Four Seasons Hotel & Residences (1111 14th Street)
640 feet
45 stories
2010

5. 1144 Fifteenth
617 feet
40 stories
2018

6. 1999 Broadway
545 feet
43 stories
1985

7. 707 17th Street
522 feet
43 stories
1985

8. 555 17th Street
507 feet
40 stories
1978

9. Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center (650 15th Street)
489 feet
38 stories
2005

10. Spire (891 14th Street)
478 feet
41 stories
2009

11. Block 162 (675 15th Street)
460 feet
30 stories
2021

12. 1670 Broadway
448 feet
34 stories
1980

13. 17th Street Plaza (1225 17th Street)
438 feet
33 stories
1982

14. 633 17th Street
434 feet
32 stories
1974

15. Brooks Tower (1020 15th Street)
420 feet
42 stories
1968

16. Denver Place (999 18th Street)
416 feet
34 stories
1981

17. One Tabor Center (1200 17th Street)
416 feet
34 stories
1984

18. Johns Manville Plaza (717 17th Street)
404 feet
29 stories
1978

19. Granite Tower (1099 18th Street)
398 feet
31 stories
1983

20. The Ritz-Carlton (1881 Curtis Street)
390 feet
38 stories
1983

21. U.S. Bank Tower (950 17th Street)
389 feet
26 stories
1975

22. 621 17th Street
385 feet
28 stories
1957

23. 1600 Glenarm Place
384 feet
32 stories
1967

24. One Lincoln Park
380 feet
32 stories
2008

25. Denver Financial Center (1775 Sherman Street)
374 feet
32 stories
1981

When it's completed, 1900 Lawrence should be fifteenth on the list. Here's the floor plan for the project:
click to enlarge The ground-floor plan for 1900 Lawrence. - 1900LAWRENCE.COM
The ground-floor plan for 1900 Lawrence.
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Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts