A monument of the Ten Commandments has stood proudly in front of Grand Junction City Hall for over forty years, but last year a group that saw it as a violation of the separation between church and state demanded its removal in a lawsuit. Grand Junction's elected officials countered by creating a "Cornerstones of Law and Liberty Plaza" featuring a section of the Bill of Rights, the preamble to the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Mayflower Compact and the Magna Carta. The ploy worked: Last month, the protesters dropped their lawsuit, thereby guaranteeing that the commandments shalt not be removed.
A monument of the Ten Commandments has stood proudly in front of Grand Junction City Hall for over forty years, but last year a group that saw it as a violation of the separation between church and state demanded its removal in a lawsuit. Grand Junction's elected officials countered by creating a "Cornerstones of Law and Liberty Plaza" featuring a section of the Bill of Rights, the preamble to the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Mayflower Compact and the Magna Carta. The ploy worked: Last month, the protesters dropped their lawsuit, thereby guaranteeing that the commandments shalt not be removed.


In December, the following advertisement for the Denver Bible Church appeared in a Denver daily newspaper listing the "Top Ten Reasons Why Liberals Hate the Holidays."

10. Thanksgiving is mass murder for turkeys.

9. Too many SUVs traveling to grandma's house.

8. College bowl games encourage competition.

7. Millions of Christmas trees are cut down.

6. The Pilgrims thought up Thanksgiving, not the Indians.

5. Christmas lights waste electricity.

4. People are giving thanks to WHO?

3. Winter lull in global warming hype.

2. Daycare centers are closed.

1. Christmas celebrates a birth, not an abortion.

In December, the following advertisement for the Denver Bible Church appeared in a Denver daily newspaper listing the "Top Ten Reasons Why Liberals Hate the Holidays."

10. Thanksgiving is mass murder for turkeys.

9. Too many SUVs traveling to grandma's house.

8. College bowl games encourage competition.

7. Millions of Christmas trees are cut down.

6. The Pilgrims thought up Thanksgiving, not the Indians.

5. Christmas lights waste electricity.

4. People are giving thanks to WHO?

3. Winter lull in global warming hype.

2. Daycare centers are closed.

1. Christmas celebrates a birth, not an abortion.


St. John's Episcopal Cathedral is a Capital Hill institution, but even longtime churchgoers were wowed by their guest in January. The Reverend George Carey, better known as the Archbishop of Canterbury -- spiritual leader of 92 million Anglican Christians around the world -- had come to town to preside over the installation of the Reverend Peter Eaton as the ninth dean of the 142-year-old congregation. The stately processional inside the cathedral was led by a church member swinging an incense-filled censer, but with a Western twist: Lakota and Kiowa Indians in full regalia joined the procession, along with representatives from the Catholic church and a local mosque. Parts of the celebration were even in Spanish. Denver may be a long way from England, but we still have a connection to the sceptered isle.
St. John's Episcopal Cathedral is a Capital Hill institution, but even longtime churchgoers were wowed by their guest in January. The Reverend George Carey, better known as the Archbishop of Canterbury -- spiritual leader of 92 million Anglican Christians around the world -- had come to town to preside over the installation of the Reverend Peter Eaton as the ninth dean of the 142-year-old congregation. The stately processional inside the cathedral was led by a church member swinging an incense-filled censer, but with a Western twist: Lakota and Kiowa Indians in full regalia joined the procession, along with representatives from the Catholic church and a local mosque. Parts of the celebration were even in Spanish. Denver may be a long way from England, but we still have a connection to the sceptered isle.
The home of late socialite Tweet Kimball is arguably the most spectacular in Colorado. Modeled after a Scottish castle, it sits on a bluff that offers mind-boggling views of the Front Range, from Pikes Peak to Longs Peak. Kimball could have sold the 3,000-acre property for millions of dollars but instead chose to create a foundation that has preserved the ranch as open space; it recently opened the stone castle to the public. A devoted Anglophile, Kimball lived in England for several years, and the castle's designer, Denver architect Burnham Hoyt, included a cavernous Great Hall, complete with a minstrel balcony for visiting musicians. One whole room is filled with photos of Winston Churchill and Princess Anne, who visited the ranch and rode horses there. A winding stairway that circles up inside a turret is reminiscent of the Tower of London. The antique furniture and art are suitably grand, with overstuffed armchairs and elaborately carved serving tables. Cherokee Ranch and Castle is also a perfect place for afternoon tea, which is served every Thursday in the Great Hall and includes salmon, scones, clotted cream, jam and sweets. Tours of the castle are offered several times a week, but call ahead, because reservations -- and directions to the hard-to-find mansion -- are required. If you want to be king or queen for a day, this is the place.
The home of late socialite Tweet Kimball is arguably the most spectacular in Colorado. Modeled after a Scottish castle, it sits on a bluff that offers mind-boggling views of the Front Range, from Pikes Peak to Longs Peak. Kimball could have sold the 3,000-acre property for millions of dollars but instead chose to create a foundation that has preserved the ranch as open space; it recently opened the stone castle to the public. A devoted Anglophile, Kimball lived in England for several years, and the castle's designer, Denver architect Burnham Hoyt, included a cavernous Great Hall, complete with a minstrel balcony for visiting musicians. One whole room is filled with photos of Winston Churchill and Princess Anne, who visited the ranch and rode horses there. A winding stairway that circles up inside a turret is reminiscent of the Tower of London. The antique furniture and art are suitably grand, with overstuffed armchairs and elaborately carved serving tables. Cherokee Ranch and Castle is also a perfect place for afternoon tea, which is served every Thursday in the Great Hall and includes salmon, scones, clotted cream, jam and sweets. Tours of the castle are offered several times a week, but call ahead, because reservations -- and directions to the hard-to-find mansion -- are required. If you want to be king or queen for a day, this is the place.


For half a century, Arvada's men and women in blue have been enforcing the law and protecting the citizenship of this Denver suburb. Now some of that history can be viewed in the Arvada Police Department's display in the lobby of its building. It includes dozens of photos, uniforms, badges and other memorabilia donated by retired cops -- a most arresting exhibit.
For half a century, Arvada's men and women in blue have been enforcing the law and protecting the citizenship of this Denver suburb. Now some of that history can be viewed in the Arvada Police Department's display in the lobby of its building. It includes dozens of photos, uniforms, badges and other memorabilia donated by retired cops -- a most arresting exhibit.


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