Denver Development

How Many People Will Live in Denver in 2030?

Denver7 via YouTube file photo
State demographer Elizabeth Garner has predicted that Denver could face a slowing-growth crisis before the decade is out — and signs that this forecast will prove accurate are already surfacing. Note that this week, Denver Public Schools announced a proposal to consolidate ten elementary and middle schools because of lower admission and birth rates, among other factors.

But while the city's population isn't rising as quickly as it did over the previous ten years, when Denver added approximately 388,000 new residents between 2010 and 2018, the number of people who call the Mile High City home is still expected to increase substantially by 2030, according to the Colorado Demography Office, which Garner heads — and the State of Colorado could grow at a similar rate.

The agency predicts that by decade's end, Denver will be more than 80,000 residents larger, while Colorado's population will leap by nearly 700,000.

The most recent Colorado population estimate from the U.S. Census Bureau, updated in July 2021, stands at 5,812,069 — and the Colorado Demography Office foresees the state's population reaching 6,499,620 in 2030, for a difference of 687,551.

Here are the office's figures for the state,  with population statistics for 2019 and 2020, as well as 2030 predictions, broken down by five age groups. The biggest gains are anticipated in the 25-to-44 and 65-and-above categories.
Colorado population total, 2019: 5,734,932
Colorado population total, 2020: 5,782,902
Colorado population total, 2030 prediction: 6,499,620

0-17
2019: 1,255,578
2020: 1,248,342
2030 prediction: 1,257,273

18 to 24
2019: 558,558
2020: 561,195
2030 prediction: 598,936

25 to 44
2019: 1,651,036
2020: 1,670,198
2030 prediction: 1,924,833

45 to 64
2019: 1,429,911
2020: 1,430,818
2030 prediction: 1,531,521

65+
2019: 839,849
2020: 872,349
2030 prediction: 1,187,057
The U.S. Census Bureau's July 2021 population estimate for the City and County of Denver is 711,463. The Colorado Demography Office sees that amount climbing to 799,209 by 2030, a bump of 87,746.

The 2030 Denver forecast includes a more granular look at five-year demographic categories running from birth to those older than 95. Here are the details:
0-4
Male: 20,742
Female: 19,857
Total: 40,600

5-9
Male: 17,854
Female: 16,011
Total: 33,051

10-14
Male: 17,040
Female: 16,011
Total: 33,051

15-19
Male: 17,948
Female: 16,985
Total: 34,932

20-24
Male: 23,815
Female: 22,885
Total: 46,699

25-29
Male: 38,723
Female: 38,352
Total: 77,073

30-34
Male: 35,936
Female: 35,849
Total: 71,784

35-39
Male: 32,280
Female: 32,413
Total: 64,692

40-44
Male: 33,148
Female: 33,830
Total: 66,978

45-49
Male: 30,567
Female: 30,700
Total: 61,270

50-54
Male: 27,947
Female: 26,974
Total: 54,922

55-59
Male: 26,849
Female: 24,735
Total: 51,584

60-64
Male: 22,756
Female: 20,758
Total: 43,514

65-69
Male: 18,705
Female: 18,145
Total: 36,849

70-74
Male: 15,298
Female: 16,201
Total: 31,502

75-79
Male: 11,089
Female: 12,500
Total: 23,588

80-84
Male: 7,026
Female: 8,800
Total: 15,828

85-89
Male: 3,157
Female: 4,614
Total: 7,770

90-94
Male: 1,234
Female: 2,206
Total: 3,439

95+
Male: 452
Female: 1,058
Total: 1,509
Such predictions will be the backdrop for the annual Colorado State Demography Summit, scheduled to get underway on November 4. "This one-day conference offers attendees the opportunity to learn about the most current population and economic estimates and forecasts for the state and its regions," the office notes. "The morning sessions will cover the economic and population conditions and outlook for the state and their implications. The afternoon session will dig deeper into data tools, data reliability and data definitions." Get more details here.
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Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts

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