Comment of the Day

Reader: We Don't Have the Highway Infrastructure to Handle the Olympics

A model of a proposed speed-skating arena that was to be built near South High School for the 1976 Winter Olympics Games in Denver — the ones that didn't happen.
A model of a proposed speed-skating arena that was to be built near South High School for the 1976 Winter Olympics Games in Denver — the ones that didn't happen. Denver Public Library
The long-awaited decision from the Winter Games Exploratory Committee regarding whether Denver should pursue the Olympics came down on Friday, June 1, and it was entirely predictable. The committee is encouraging not just the Mile High City, but all of Colorado to pursue future Olympic Games, but with some stipulations (see the end of this post for more on those).

Response from readers was fast and largely furious, as they overwhelmingly rejected the committee's decision.

Ryan says:
I'd prefer if Colorado was the only state to turn it down, twice.
Phyllis adds:
Nope, we don't have a highway infrastructure to handle the Olympics.
Zack explains:
Denver can and should focus on affordable housing.
Alex notes:
Naw, they can go back to Salt Lake City.
Says Meredith:
Ugh. I-70 can't take the strain. Fix it, add a train and we can talk. Until then, I will vote no.
John argues:
All they need to show me is one example that didn’t go flying off the tracks into the land of lost revenue, abandoned event sites, extreme congestion and mountains of failed promises, and maybe I’d consider it. Until that fairy tale becomes reality, easy pass on the Olympic scam.
And then there's this rare positive note from Chuck: 
I love the idea.
Keep reading for more stories about Colorado's troubled relationship with the Olympics.
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