Film and TV

Al Jourgensen's Ass Among Week Two Highlights From Denver Film Fest 2018

Ministry's Al Jourgensen showing off his assets at the Denver Film Festival as the Dead Kennedys' Jello Biafra and My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult's Frankie "Groovie Mann" Nardiello look on.
Ministry's Al Jourgensen showing off his assets at the Denver Film Festival as the Dead Kennedys' Jello Biafra and My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult's Frankie "Groovie Mann" Nardiello look on. Photo by Michael Roberts
I feel confident in saying that never before in the 41-year history of the Denver Film Festival has a member of a panel dropped trou and showed his ass to the audience. But this new ground was broken on Friday, November 9, following the Colorado debut of Industrial Accident: The Wax Trax! Records Story, when Ministry's Al Jourgensen, joined by the Dead Kennedy's Jello Biafra and My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult's Frankie "Groovie Mann" Nardiello, unbuckled his belt and displayed a wide variety of assets.

A rear view of Jourgensen's man meat swung into view, too, which is why we've pixelated a key portion of the photo above. You're welcome, by the way.

The discussion that followed Jourgensen's unveiling was unquestionably the craziest I've witnessed at DFF in more than a decade of covering it — and given the ultra-awkward Q&A about the flat-Earth movement described in our weekend one roundup of fest activities, that's impressive.

In all, I caught seventeen films during DFF's 2018 edition at venues such as the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, the Sie FilmCenter and the UA Pavilions. Some were great, others less so — and one seemed to leave audience members so traumatized that as soon as the credits began to roll, hundreds of them fled toward the exits like inmates who suddenly discovered that a power surge had caused all their cell doors to open. As such, its director was left to offer his take on what had just unspooled to a house that was suddenly more than half empty.


Here's the rundown of eight screenings from week two.
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Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts