Art

Ten Arty Things to Do and See This Weekend in Denver

Mia Brownell, "Plate to Platelet III,"  2017. Oil on linen.
Mia Brownell, "Plate to Platelet III," 2017. Oil on linen. Mia Brownell
Update, January 12, 2018: The Dorothy Tanner Lumonics Mind Spa installation will not be completed on schedule, but the team anticipates it will be finished around January 16.

Exhibits opening this week run the gamut in subject matter, from works by tattoo artists to an installation of mind-blowing light sculptures by nonagenarian Dorothy Tanner. Famous women will be celebrated and the issues of modern times torn apart; teaching artists share their process, and artists of the new West find their place in history in a survey focusing on one of Denver’s finest galleries. Here’s how to keep busy with art, all weekend long.

click to enlarge Adrienne Norris pays tribute to badass women. - ADRIENNE NORRIS
Adrienne Norris pays tribute to badass women.
Adrienne Norris
Adrienne Norris: Women Behaving Badly
GLBT Community Center of Colorado, 1301 East Colfax Avenue
January 10 through March
Opening Reception: Wednesday, January 10, 5 to 7 p.m.

Portrait painter Adrienne Norris’s ongoing Women Behaving Badly series regularly focuses on historically notable women role models with badass credentials, but a new gallery installation at the GLBT Community Center of Colorado narrows the lens even more to showcase heroic women in the queer community. Norris, who collages her original watercolor tributes together with photos and news clippings into a montage, says she loves playing historian and researching the women whose portraits she paints to create a finished piece.

click to enlarge Firehouse Art Center's ThINK explores tattoo art, on and off the skin. - MORGAN ALYNN
Firehouse Art Center's ThINK explores tattoo art, on and off the skin.
Morgan Alynn
ThINK!
Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Avenue, Longmont
January 4 through February 4
Opening Reception: Friday, January 12, 6 to 9 p.m.

Tattoo art at its simplest is another form of drawing, rooted in illustration, albeit one rendered on a human canvas. So it follows that the best tattoo artists instinctively also know how to draw. Sure, it pays to be steady-handed, too, but every tattoo starts with the line composition of a talented draftsman. ThINK!, a new exhibit at the Firehouse Art Center of works selected by Firehouse curation assistant Grace Gutierrez, explores the decorative art form, on and off the skin, striving to show off the artistic soul that hides behind every tattoo. The show’s motto? “You don’t have to like tattoos, have tattoos, or have full sleeves to see the splendor in these artists’ work.” Dig it.


click to enlarge Tom Judd, "Rushmore," oil on canvas. - ROBISCHON GALLERY
Tom Judd, "Rushmore," oil on canvas.
Robischon Gallery
Tom Judd, Disruption
Jerry Kunkel, RECON TEXT
Terry Maker, Point Blank
Jim Sanborn, Meridian
Edie Winograde, Place and Time: Reenactment Pageant
Robischon Gallery, 1740 Wazee Street
January 11 through March 3
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 11, 6 to 8 p.m.

Robischon Gallery marches into 2018 with a whopping five solo shows focused on issues of the day and their historical infrastructure. The prescient all-star artists — Tom Judd, Jerry Kunkel, Terry Maker, Jim Sanborn and Edie Winograde — do so with much-needed humor in a mixture of paintings, sculpture and photography.

click to enlarge Mia Brownell,  "Still Life With Sun Spots." - MIA BROWNELL, COURTESY OF GOODWIN GALLERY
Mia Brownell,  "Still Life With Sun Spots."
Mia Brownell, courtesy of Goodwin Gallery
Mia Brownell: Plates to Platelets and Other Things That Travel and Bind
Art Gallery at the Fulginiti Pavilion, 13080 East 19th Avenue, Aurora
January 11 through March 8
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 11, 4 to 7 p.m.


Lost Pollinators: Mia Brownell, Alison Mary Kay, Kara Maria
Goodwin Fine Art, 1255 Delaware Street
January 12 through February 24
Opening Reception: Friday, January 12, 6 to 8 p.m.

Painter Mia Brownell, whose monochrome still-life imagery re-envisions the natural world at the molecular level, gets a two-fer in January, beginning with a solo, Plates to Platelets and Other Things That Travel and Bind, a wholly appropriate exhibit for a medical facility, which opens January 11 at the Fulginiti Center on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora. Beginning January 12, Brownell also shares space with Alison Mary Kay and Kara Maria at Goodwin Fine Art for Lost Pollinators; both shows take cues from science, biology and environmental concerns.

click to enlarge Brandon Siscoe, “untitled: first pressing of antonin artaud's the theatre and its double 1938,” wine glass. - BRANDON SISCOE, VICKI MYHREN GALLERY
Brandon Siscoe, “untitled: first pressing of antonin artaud's the theatre and its double 1938,” wine glass.
Brandon Siscoe, Vicki Myhren Gallery
Fieldworks: Creative Research by DU Faculty
Vicki Myhren Gallery, 2121 East Asbury Avenue
January 11 through February 18
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 11, 5 to 9 p.m.

The University of Denver’s Myhren Gallery goes behind the scenes of the artistic process with an unusual kind of faculty show: Instead of exhibiting finished work in a familiar gallery setting, Fieldworks also delves into research projects and works-in-progress by eight DU faculty members from the studio art and emergent digital practices programs for a holistic look at the art of making work. Artists include Jennifer Ghormley, Sarah Gjertson, Scott Montgomery, Brandon Siscoe, Megan Ulrich, Kristin Stransky Mallinger, Kari Varner and Timothy Weaver; attend artist talks from 6 to 7 p.m. January 25 and February 8, or noon to 12:45 p.m. on February 14.

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Contact: Susan Froyd