Holidays

Celebrate Passover at Eight Community Seders in Denver

A traditional seder plate holds a shank bone, egg, vegetable, bitter herbs and charoset.
A traditional seder plate holds a shank bone, egg, vegetable, bitter herbs and charoset. Courtesy of Safta


click to enlarge A traditional seder plate has a shank bone, egg, vegetable, bitter herbs and charoset. - CINDY YABROVE
A traditional seder plate has a shank bone, egg, vegetable, bitter herbs and charoset.
Cindy Yabrove
Passover starts Friday night, which means it's time to mark the holiday with a seder (or two) — a dinner celebrating the Jewish people's escape from slavery in Egypt. Many will mark the occasion with their families; others prefer to do so at larger gatherings. If you're new to town or looking to connect with the wider Jewish community, there are seders around the metro area that will suit people of many backgrounds and beliefs.


Chabad Jewish Center Seder

Friday, April 19, 7 p.m. and Saturday April 20, 7:30 p.m.
Chabad Jewish Center, 9950 Lone Tree Parkway
The Chabad Jewish Center of the South Metro Area is hosting an all-ages seder that will tell the Passover story through a Kabbalistic lens. There will be humor, music, a traditional feast and no shortage of wine. Tickets, $50 for adults and $30 for children, can be reserved through the Chabad Jewish Center's South Metro Area event page.

click to enlarge A traditional seder plate holds a shank bone, egg, vegetable, bitter herbs and charoset. - COURTESY OF SAFTA
A traditional seder plate holds a shank bone, egg, vegetable, bitter herbs and charoset.
Courtesy of Safta
Chabad of NW Metro Denver Community Seder
Friday, April 19, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Front Range Community College, 3645 West 112th Avenue, Westminster
Chabad of NW Denver in Westminster is hosting a family-friendly seder with an interactive service that focuses on why Passover and the freedom of the Jewish people is relevant today. Tickets, $50 for adults and $35 for children, are available on the Chabad House website. Anyone looking for a place to celebrate Passover is welcome, and no one will be turned away for lack of funds. For seder tickets, email Rabbi Benjy Brackman at [email protected]

click to enlarge A seder plate made at the Temple Sinai preschool in 1994. - CINDY YABROVE
A seder plate made at the Temple Sinai preschool in 1994.
Cindy Yabrove
Teen Seder Mystery Challenge
Saturday, April 20, 7:30 p.m.
Chabad Jewish Center of South Metro Denver, 9950 Lone Tree Parkway, Lone Tree
Teens will be running the show at this one-of-a-kind interactive seder. Members of the South Metro Chabad Cteen club and their families will work together to solve the mystery of Passover using fifteen clues given throughout the seder. Music and storytelling will help guide participants through the challenge, ultimately revealing the secret of Passover. The seder is free for teens and their families, but donations will be accepted. Reservations are required and can be made on the Cteen website.

click to enlarge A photo of the Cherry Creek Chabad's pre-Passover table. - COURTESY OF RABBI SHMULY ENGEL
A photo of the Cherry Creek Chabad's pre-Passover table.
Courtesy of Rabbi Shmuly Engel
Chabad of Cherry Creek
Friday, April 19, 7 p.m.
Jacquard Hotel, 222 Milwaukee Street
Chabad of Cherry Creek is partnering with Jacquard Hotel to host a welcoming seder in an elegant setting. The matzah will be handmade, the wine delicious, and, of course, the Jewish people's exit from Egypt will be remembered. Tickets are $40 for adults and $20 for kids. For more information, visit the Chabad of Cherry Creek website.
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Zoe Yabrove is a Denver native with an undergraduate degree in creative writing and a master’s in special education. She is a teacher in Denver Public Schools and contributes to Westword to get her writing fix.
Contact: Zoe Yabrove