Williams & Graham

Denver is so into cocktail culture that ordering a drink — be it a Manhattan made with Colorado whiskey and handcrafted bitters or a Moscow Mule — can be an agonizing dilemma. Cocktail syllabuses are even beginning to outshine menus, both in breadth and depth. But Williams & Graham, the elegant new speakeasy in Highland, is not only packed with a profundity of knowledge, but it displays a refreshing and deliberate lack of pretense. The bar is commanded by tenders who understand that you want a damn drink, not a judgmental oral exam on why you drink what you do. The cocktails they concoct are bright, fresh and bold, whether they're classic revivals or modern journeys into territory unknown.

Readers' Choice: Green Russell

Frijoles Colorado Cuban Cafe

No matter how cold it is outside, the atmosphere inside Frijoles Colorado Cuban Cafe is downright beachy. This family-run spot that opened last year in a Lakewood strip mall moves to its own island rhythm. Roxana and Sergio Negrin man the counter and do the cooking, and they turn out excellent ropa vieja, lechón, Cuban sandwiches and Cuban empanadas, plus an array of specials — including guava-sauced ribs — that offer a taste of both Cuba and Florida, the places they once called home. Finish your meal with a slice of flan and a cafecito — a superb shot of sweet espresso — and you may want to express your joy by shouting "Que rico!" over the din.

Buchi Cafe Cubano
Ariel Fried

We've seen plenty of ham, pork and Swiss cheese sandwiches posing as Cubans, but the real deal is a rarity in this town. At Buchi Cafe Cubano, a sweet spot in Highland, though, the Cuban sandwich is absolutely authentic, right down to the Cuban bread: a slightly sweet, crusty white loaf similar to — but not the same as — French bread. Buchi stacks this bread with slices of ham, succulent roast pork, layers of Swiss and pickles, then grills it in the panini press until the cheese is gooey. A smear of hot mustard adds the classic final touch before this sublime sandwich is simply wrapped in a sheet of butcher paper and delivered to your eager hands.

Super Star Asian Cuisine
Cassandra Kotnik

Even a recent expansion hasn't thinned the impenetrable crowds that descend upon Super Star Asian. They huddle and mutter under their breath near the doorway, their eyes peering over the cavernous combat zone, where fast-moving carts dash between big, round tables covered with bamboo steamers of everything under the dim sum sun: terrific shu mai and congee, salt-and-pepper shrimp, barbecued pork buns and egg-custard tarts, chicken feet and Peking duck. And while you'll bust your belt, beg for mercy and implore someone with a modicum of moderation to carry you out the door, you'll be back...again and again.

Readers' Choice: Star Kitchen

Biker Jim's Gourmet Dogs
Summer Powell

Biker Jim's Gourmet Dogs has been hawking fat sausages from a handful of carts for years now, but last spring, Jim Pittenger also opened a brick-and-mortar establishment that's quickly become a mainstay for those looking for a cheap dinner before a night on the town — or a cheap dinner at the end of a long night, since this spot stays open after last call on weekends. Most of the dogs — including such exotic sausages as boar, elk and veal — run just $6 or $7 and come piled high with caramelized onions and decorated with a ribbon of cream cheese. That still leaves you a couple of bucks for a side of deep-fried mac and cheese. Or go with the Usual, which nets you a topped dog, fries and a PBR for just $9.25.

Readers' Choice: Chipotle

PS Lounge
Scott Lentz

Like most dive bars in this town, the PS Lounge is a place we'd never want to see in the daylight; we're guessing the old sports paraphernalia and playbills lining the walls would look a lot more grimy and a lot less charming. But at night, the Lounge commands a special place in our dive-loving hearts. The place has its quirks: the cash-only establishment won't let you keep a running tab, for instance, and you'll have to walk down the street if you need an ATM. But Pete, the bar's owner, will also send you a round (or two) of Alabama Slammers, a sweet, Day-Glo-orange concoction made of sloe gin, SoCo and orange juice that tastes more like Tang, just to show his appreciation for your patronage, and he'll give the ladies in your group each a red rose. And if those gestures aren't enough to win you over, the down-home atmosphere that draws hipsters and Colfax creatures alike is sure the seal the deal. Dive, he said.

Readers' Choice: Don's Club Tavern

The Park Tavern and Restaurant
Mark Antonation

We're big fans of the grimy ambience at the Park Tavern, a dark, sprawling dive with a couple of pool tables and weekly trivia nights. When we want to relax after work at a neighborhood bar, there's no better place. In fact, when we want to relax at almost any hour, there's no better spot. That's because during happy hour, the Park Tavern offers two-for-one deals on wines, wells and drafts — and those happy-hour deals are offered at least twice daily. On Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, they're offered thrice — and on Tuesday, you can get $2.50 you-call-its from 4 p.m. until close. So chances are good that no matter when you drink at the Park Tavern, you're going to be drinking cheaply.

Falling Rock Tap House

These days beer lovers in Denver have a lot of choices when it comes to bars, restaurants and tap rooms where they can find great craft brews. But when the besotted masses are looking for the most choices all in one place, they still turn to Falling Rock Tap House, where the 75-plus handles stretch the length of the long bar and have included, at one time or another, just about every big, bold, rare or highly sought-after beer that has come through town. Bring your beer knowledge and your thirst.

Readers' Choice: Falling Rock Tap House

DJ's Berkeley Cafe

You know the eggs Benedict that litter the breakfast menus of just about every cafe and diner in Denver? These are not those eggs Benedict, with hollandaise from a pre-mixed pouch. No, at DJ's Berkeley Cafe, eggs Benedict are held in higher esteem than your overall happiness; they're more sacred than marriage, more royal than Kate and Wills. Our favorite is the New Mexican Benedict, a bluff of fragile poached eggs and fire-roasted poblano chiles straddling two intensely spiced chorizo sausages resting on a smear of cheddar polenta. This is a magnificent dish that tastes of early-morning sunshine — and the scratch-made hollandaise, singing with lemon, is good enough to drink.

Queen of Sheba Ethiopian Restaurant
Mark Manger

Denver has a large Ethiopian population, and as a result, we have a wealth of Ethiopian restaurants. The one we keep returning to again and again, though, is Queen of Sheba, a sparsely decorated spot on East Colfax. Owner Zewditu (Zodi) Aboye does all of the cooking here, and she doesn't rush, so service can be unbelievably slow. But the wait is always worth it: The platter that finally hits your table comes with folds of injera and transcendental stews of lamb, lentils, chickpeas and chicken, plus shish kabob-like tibs. Washed down with an Ethiopian beer, it's always a feast fit for a Queen.

Readers' Choice: Arada Restaurant

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