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Review: Beats Antique at the Fillmore, 12/3/11


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BEATS ANTIQUE at THE FILLMORE AUDITORIUM | 12/3/11


When Zoe Jakes emerged from stage right during the opening song adorned in a traditional bedleh and a painted mask to tease, it was pretty much set in stone that the remainder of the evening would include sultry hip gyrations, explosive dance moves and seductive, contemporary gypsy dance music. And that's just what was delivered as Beats Antique rolled through tracks old and new in front of a packed house at the Fillmore last night.

The most exciting part of the whole show was the prospect of the unexpected. Beats brings the energy level up until it peaks with a trio of synchronized dancers luring each and every set of eyes into a trance on songs like "Dope Crunk" and the remix of Glitch Mob's "Swarm." Given the outfit's lust for creativity and for producing an awe-inspiring live show, it wasn't too surprising when David Satori announced what sounded like an on-the-fly decision to play a new Bassnectar remix just finished that morning and then delivered the track with flawless precision.

Despite being on tour in support of its new album Elektrafone, Beats Antique still treated fans at the Fillmore to a heaping helping of favorites such as "Beauty Beats," which showed serious fiddle work on behalf of Satori. This gave the crowd a renewed sense of energy as the group played the latter half of its set.

Satori, the master behind the fiddle, banjo, samples and cuts, could barely contain his excitement. Throughout the show, he expressed gratitude to the full venue and offered up praise to the guest brass section, led by Sylvain Carton. Carton, visiting Denver by way of Paris, France, is a multi-instrumentalist and composer whose presence was both welcomed and felt. "Cat Skillz" was deeply resonate thanks to the strong bass blasted from Carton's baritone sax.

Four projectors displayed the visual mastery of Johnathan Singer. With Alex and Allison Grey painting on stage for the entirety of the show, we saw the full spectrum of Grey's work shape-shifting across the screen, as well as a live feed of the speaker himself painting during the show.

Tipper, who we all wished was bringing his Tipper Sound Experience, which consists of a rare Funktion-One sound system, didn't disappoint. With heavy bass lines amid live scratching, Tipper juggled between old jazz horn beats and modern dub lines. Gracing the stage with him were three breakdancers, who popped, locked and ticked at various times throughout the set. The projections, as psychedelic and respectful as they were to Grey's work, often showed a question mark, which got a little annoying as the set went on.


CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK

Personal Bias: The only word I can use to describe this show is "amazing." Random Detail: The Bassnectar remix was ill. By the Way: To all the freezing girls: Wear more clothes?

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