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The Velveteers Ran Out of Songs, but the Crowd Wanted More

The Velveteers Ran Out of Songs, but the Crowd Wanted More
Karl Christian Krumpholz
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“I was seventeen years old, and it was my first time ever playing a show. There was a blizzard, so we thought nobody was going to show up. However, there was a good crowd with several local musicians we all looked up to, making us even more nervous than we already were. Everyone sat on the ground in true Gypsy House style, the air of the dark lit room filled with hookah smoke.

The Velveteers Ran Out of Songs, but the Crowd Wanted More
Karl Christian Krumpholz

“Everything was going smoothly until our last song. I was trying to thank the other bands, but instead I ended up thanking ourselves. I was so embarrassed. The audience just started laughing. I was terrified. Everybody must have thought I was so full of myself. We finished our last song, and the crowd wanted an encore. We weren’t prepared for it since we only knew how to play eight songs, all of which we had already played. So we just walked off stage, leaving the crowd chanting for like five minutes, and never did that encore. It was pretty punk rock.”

The Velveteers Ran Out of Songs, but the Crowd Wanted More
Karl Christian Krumpholz

The Velveteers’ self-titled debut EP comes out on Wednesday, February 7. The band will celebrate the release at the hi-dive on Friday, February 9.

Editor's Note: The Denver Bootleg is a series chronicling the history of local music venues by longtime Denver cartoonist Karl Christian Krumpholz. Visit Krumpholz's website to see more of his work.

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