Business

Ten Most Expensive Neighborhoods for Rent in Denver This Fall

Photo by Lindsey Bartlett
Once again, there's good news and bad news in Zumper's latest report about rent prices in Denver, this one focusing on the fall of 2017. The good news is that the average cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment in the ten most expensive Denver neighborhoods right now is typically down from the levels we documented in our spring and summer roundups. The bad news is that median rent for a one-bedroom in the most sought-after location is up by more than $100, bringing the cost to a jaw-slackening $2,000 per month.

The rental market in the Mile High City is clearly volatile at present. Note that by Zumper's calculations, the average price for a one-bedroom in Athmar Park ($1,100) and Capitol Hill ($1,275) are both up around 12 percent.

In contrast, median one-bedroom rent has dipped more than 10 percent in Berkeley ($1,200) and Sunnyside ($1,175). And one-bedrooms in four of the ten most expensive neighborhoods has tumbled by more than a Franklin in the last three months.

Below, we've got photo-illustrated facts and figures for the Denver neighborhoods with the most expensive rent this fall, with direct comparisons to the data from this spring and summer. Continue for the sometimes good/sometimes bad news.

click to enlarge
Stapleton.
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Number 10: Stapleton

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Spring 2017: $1,400

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Summer 2017: $1,439

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Fall 2017: $1,470


Increase/decrease: +$70 (Spring), +$31 (Summer)

Lincoln Park.
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Number 9: Lincoln Park


Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Spring 2017: $1,490

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Summer 2017: $1,600

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Fall 2017: $1,500


Increase/decrease: +$10 (Spring), -$100 (Summer)

Cherry Creek.
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Number 7 (tie): Cherry Creek


Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Spring 2017: $1,700

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Summer 2017: $1,669

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Fall 2017: $1,550


Increase/decrease: -$150 (Spring), -$119 (Summer)

Baker.
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Number 7 (tie): Baker

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Spring 2017: $1,500

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Summer 2017: $1,694

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Fall 2017: $1,550


Increase/decrease: +$50 (Spring), -$144 (Summer)

Five Points.
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Number 6: Five Points

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Spring 2017: $1,590

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Summer 2017: $1,640

Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Fall 2017: $1,600


Increase/decrease: +$10 (Spring), -$40 (Summer)
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Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts