4
| Lists |

Nine Colorado Counties Where Marriage Is Least Unpopular

^
Keep Westword Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free.

Marriage may not be going out of style in Colorado counties, but it hasn't exactly gained in popularity over the past forty years — with one exception.

The numbers supporting this statement come courtesy of FindTheBest.com, using data originally assembled by the genealogy website MooseRoots.

The figures show that the percentage of people who are married went up in only one Colorado county from 1970 to 2010, the most recent year for which census digits are available.

Look below to discover the name of the one Colorado county to buck the trend, followed by the eight in which the percentages fell by the smallest amount.

These entries are followed by a heat map that provides marriage numbers for every Colorado county — not just these nine — for each decade from 1970 to 2010. Click on the arrow on the bottom left to move through the years — and click on the counties themselves to get much more information.

Number 9: Montrose County
Percentage married in 2010: 62.2 percent
Change since 1970: Down 5.9 percent

Number 8: Weld County
Percentage married in 2010: 56.5 percent
Change since 1970: Down 5.5 percent

Number 7: Teller County
Percentage married in 2010: 63.3 percent
Change since 1970: Down 4.4 percent

Number 6: Delta County
Percentage married in 2010: 62.4 percent
Change since 1970: Down 4.4 percent

Number 5: Las Animas County
Percentage married in 2010: 52.9 percent
Change since 1970: Down 2.7 percent

Number 4: Pitkin County
Percentage married in 2010: 52.4 percent
Change since 1970: Down 0.8 percent

Number 3: Elbert County
Percentage married in 2010: 68.2 percent
Change since 1970: Down 0.8 percent

Number 2: Gunnison County
Percentage married in 2010: 48.6 percent
Change since 1970: Down 0.2 percent

Number 1: Douglas County
Percentage married in 2010: 69.2 percent
Change since 1970: Up 1.2 percent


Send your story tips to the author, Michael Roberts.

Keep Westword Free... Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Denver with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Westword community and help support independent local journalism in Denver.

 

Join the Westword community and help support independent local journalism in Denver.