The gender-neutral signs above and those that follow appear as examples on the Denver web page about the new rules.
The gender-neutral signs above and those that follow appear as examples on the Denver web page about the new rules.
denvergov.org

Reader: Who Cares What Bathroom Anyone Uses?

Businesses in Denver must now advertise their single-occupant bathrooms using gender-neutral bathroom signs. Though the penalty for not following the new rule is light, officials hope the new signs will send a larger message: This is an inclusive city.

Readers weighed in on the new signage in a story written by Michael Roberts. Argues Jordan:

For anyone upset by this, can you please explain to me how making single-occupant (therefore private) restrooms gender neutral hurts anyone? I've seen/used many unisex restrooms over the years with no problem. Seems to me this will help bathroom lines go quicker (no need to wait for a designated restroom while the other sits empty). And isn't this just like the restrooms in our homes? Seriously, the only possible problem I see is the extra cost for the businesses to buy new signs, which surely won't add up to much.

Responds Chad: 

Talk about government overreach. A fine for not putting a sign on an already gender-neutral bathroom?

Adds Brian:

So here's the deal. Who cares what bathroom anyone uses? If you have to go, you have to go. Both the male and female bathrooms have the same amenities, so why does it matter?

Kim replies:

Another reason to love Denver!

Notes Christine:

I’m just confused about the part with children. It says this will help parents/caretakers or opposite sex children so they don’t have to ask a stranger to take their kid to the bathroom. That doesn’t even apply to single-occupancy bathrooms, no matter how they are labeled. You’re the only ones in there. I know they’re trying to make this easier to swallow for conservatives. But that doesn’t even make sense.

And Sonny concludes:

When will Porta Johns get the love they deserve?

Bathroom signage became a big issue in March 2016, with the passage of North Carolina's Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, which stated that individuals visiting government buildings could only use the restroom that corresponded to their gender as identified by their birth certificate. LGBTQ activists instantly identified the measure as an attack on the transgender community, and the act was repealed the following March largely because of embarrassing publicity and the potential loss of revenue: The 2017 NBA All-Star game was not held in North Carolina because of the legislation.

Denver officials sent a message of their own during this period. In December 2016, they passed an amendment to the building code that requires that all single-occupant bathrooms be gender-neutral — which means that transgender individuals can use the restroom of their choice. By April 30, all single bathrooms in the city needed to display a gender-neutral sign.

What do you think about Denver's gender-neutral bathroom sign policy? Comment on this post or send a note to editorial@westword.com.

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