Natascha Seideneck, “Fire Horizon.”EXPAND
Natascha Seideneck, “Fire Horizon.”
Natascha Seideneck

100 Colorado Creatives 4.0: Natascha Seideneck

#93: Natascha Seideneck

German-born and raised in England, Natascha Seideneck now lives and works in Denver, leading concurrent lives as a fine-art photographer at Tank Studios, a teacher at Metropolitan State College of Denver and, in the local fashion world, a sought-after hair stylist at El Salon. Her photographic work goes far beyond pictures on a wall. Part science experiment, part pirated imagery and part alchemy, transformed by the unexpected use of mediums, her photos look right up close at the stuff of earth’s natural disasters and ecological breakdowns. Learn how things look from Seideneck’s many-sided world perspective via the 100CC questionnaire.

100 Colorado Creatives 4.0: Natascha Seideneck
Third Dune Productions by Conor King

Westword: What (or who) is your creative muse?

Natascha Seideneck: That would be my late friend Steven Trujillo. He is the most creative person I have ever known. I suppose we were each other’s muses; it was always invigorating and exciting to discuss ideas for projects we were both working on.

Which three people, dead or alive, would you like to invite to your next party and why?

David Bowie, because he was such an original, and I am sure had many fantastic stories; Barack Obama, because he would  probably be fun to hang out with; and Empress Cixi, because she was a badass eccentric.

Natascha Seideneck, “Terra Incognita.”EXPAND
Natascha Seideneck, “Terra Incognita.”
Natascha Seideneck

What’s the best thing about the local creative community in your field — and the worst?

Denver has an incredibly tight-knit, supportive creative community, and I think there are still a lot of opportunities for creatives to make things happen. The downside is that the cost of living has gone up so much that space to live and work are harder to come by.

How about globally?

I am concerned that some of the major cities in the world that have been amazing creative incubators have become increasingly unaffordable and are driving artists out. However, this is also activating other places. I love the hybrid visual and tactile experiential spaces that are emerging, like Meow Wolf and Sleep No More. It seems these are the experiences people are craving in our increasingly digital world.

100 Colorado Creatives 4.0: Natascha SeideneckEXPAND
Photo by Larry Sykes

Are trends worth following? What’s one trend you love and one that you hate?

I pay no attention to trends, apart from the latest, best lip gloss. I try not to follow them! Fashion-wise, it’s just boring when everyone looks the same (e.g., beard and barber cut!). Artistically, I always feel like I am not doing what happens to be the latest trend. Maybe if I would, I could be more successful!

You’ve come this far in life. What’s still on your bucket list?

I actually don't have one. I maintain that if I died tomorrow, I feel fortunate to have had enough experiences to last a lifetime. There are, however, many countries I would still like to see.

Natascha Seideneck, “Ice Horizon.”EXPAND
Natascha Seideneck, “Ice Horizon.”
Natascha Seideneck

What’s your best or favorite accomplishment as a creative?

Hopefully, it’s yet to come! I am an educator, and teaching often makes me feel like I have accomplished something. I am participating in an exhibit at the Center for Visual Arts titled Water Line that opens later this summer, and I believe that installation will be one of my best works to date.

Denver, love it or leave it? What keeps you here — or makes you want to leave?

My amazing community keeps me here. The rising cost of living and increasing lack of diversity, however, might have me running back to my home country.

Who is your favorite Colorado Creative?

Cortney Stell, the founder of Black Cube Nomadic Museum. She’s very supportive of the Denver arts community and always up to something inventive.

Natascha Seideneck, “Frozen Earth, Pavement, River.”EXPAND
Natascha Seideneck, “Frozen Earth, Pavement, River.”
Natascha Seideneck

What's on your agenda in the coming year?

Getting a permanent teaching gig and making a lot of art.

Who do you think will get noticed in the local arts community in the coming year?

I love to see any of our art students and graduates get noticed. They’re a talented bunch.

See work from Natascha Seideneck’s Uncanny Territory series as part of Water Line: A Creative Exchange, opening with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, August 4, and running through October 21 at Metropolitan State University of Denver’s Center for Visual Art. Seideneck will also give a free artist talk at the CVA at 6 p.m. Wednesday, October 4. Visit the CVA’s website for details. Learn more about Seideneck and her work online.

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