Art

Art Attack: Great Shows and Events in Denver This Weekend

Pirate leads the way in 40 West for a Day of the Dead First Friday.
Pirate leads the way in 40 West for a Day of the Dead First Friday. Pirate: Contemporary Art
This will be another fine fall weekend full of art. The main attraction, of course, is the grand opening of the Denver Art Museum’s fancy Martin Building redo and the new exhibition ReVisión: Art in the Americas, which brings the best of the DAM’s Ancient American and Latin American Art collections out of the stacks and up to date.

But bright, shiny exhibitions are popping up in nonprofit, school and library galleries all over town, too. Here's a sampling of what you can see:


click to enlarge Sarah McKenzie, “Cage (Whitney Museum with Brendan Fernandes),” 2020, oil and acrylic on canvas. - SARAH MCKENZIE, DAVID B. SMITH GALLERY
Sarah McKenzie, “Cage (Whitney Museum with Brendan Fernandes),” 2020, oil and acrylic on canvas.
Sarah McKenzie, David B. Smith Gallery
Robert Burnier, Song Cycle
Sarah McKenzie, Interim, in the Project Room
David B. Smith Gallery, 1543 A Wazee Street
Through November 24
Chicago sculptor and installationist Robert Burnier bends, folds and scrunches flexible aluminum sheets painted with acrylics into wall sculptures that from a distance look like cloth fluttering in the wind. The ten-piece series he’s brought to the David B. Smith Gallery, collectively called Song Cycle, is inspired by a summer of deep listening to the Marvin Gaye canon. The result is a set of sculptures that fold in on themselves, like songs overlapping other songs, matching and contrasting. In the Project Room, Sarah McKenzie tackled three paintings of de-installed galleries as a reflection on the COVID-era art shutdown.
click to enlarge Steven Frost stands in front of his woven rainbow curtain. - STEVEN FROST
Steven Frost stands in front of his woven rainbow curtain.
Steven Frost
Steven Frost, Vexillologies
PlatteForum, the Savoy at Curtis Park, 2700 Arapahoe Street, Unit 102
Through November 1

Vexillologies, fiber artist and queer activist Steven Frost’s exhibition and mentor/student collaboration, was originally slated to open in July, until renovations to PlatteForum’s new location at the Savoy building in Five Points ran overtime. But now the new space is open, and Frost and his mentees can finally let their flags fly. Yes, flags: The title refers to "vexillology," a fancy word for the study of flags, something Frost’s ArtLab kids had to do in order to become flagmakers under his tutelage, learning how to cut, sew, embroider, weave and appliqué, while working in community to create banners expressing their vision for the future of PlatteForum. Frost's large-scale weaving, "The Mile High Pride Flag," will also be on view. Gallery visits thereafter by appointment at Calendly.

Pink Progression: In Skin
Philip J. Steele Gallery, RMCAD, 1600 Pierce Street
Through November 18

Artist Anna Kaye’s ongoing community project Pink Progression is back, gathering a crew of fifteen figurative artists considering skin and how it can define each of us in nuanced ways. The deep-thinking exhibition is up at the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design for a month; visit by appointment Mondays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Judy Anderson, Reading a Life. So Far.
Steve Austin, Cattails and Cardiology: The Medical Arts – Patterns of Chaos in Nature
Annalee Schorr, Tape-estry
Spark Gallery, 900 Santa Fe Drive
Through November 14
Last Look: Sunday, November 14, noon to 4 p.m.
Former PlatteForum director and co-founder Judy Anderson is up as an exhibiting artist and member of the Spark co-op, alongside painter Steve Austin and mixed-media master Annalee Schorr. Anderson’s contemplative sculptural works, some made in collaboration with Ginny Hoyle and Kyoko Ono, consider fragments of memory that might or might not be true. Austin’s artworks scrutinize the necessary collisions of science and nature integral to life, and Schorr’s cleverly named show in the North Gallery is an example of what happens when you use duct tape in rainbow colors to create folkloric patterned paintings.
click to enlarge J. Bruce Wilcox, “Tribal Elders 1 and 2.” - J. BRUCE WILCOX
J. Bruce Wilcox, “Tribal Elders 1 and 2.”
J. Bruce Wilcox
Dan Baumbach and Terrel Bailey, Meditations in Nature
J. Bruce Wilcox, Mirror
D’art Gallery, 900 Santa Fe Drive
Through November 14
Denver Arts Week Reception: Friday, November 12, 6 to 9 p.m.
Artist Talk: Sunday, November 14, 1 to 3 p.m.

Photographers Dan Baumbach and Terrel Bailey share the main room at D’art for separate solo exhibitions; both include imagery from nature and the landscape from very different viewpoints. In the East Gallery, quiltmaker J. Bruce Wilcox offers a new collection of quilted wall hangings in stunning geometric patterns and contrasting colors.
Ravi Zupa, "Mightier Than," typewriter parts. - RAVI ZUPA
Ravi Zupa, "Mightier Than," typewriter parts.
Ravi Zupa
Ravi Zupa
Art Can, 2500 Larimer Street
Through November 3
The Ramble Hotel’s Art Can pop-up shipping container gallery will be packing it away for the season on November 3, but not before one last popular artist takes over the final two-week residency. That would be the self-taught DIY phenom Ravi Zupa, who directs his scholarship and art chops to create art-history-hopping paintings, drawings and prints, and ominous machine-gun sculptures made from typewriter parts; he'll concentrate on affordable prints and gift items in this small space. The real joy of visiting the Art Can is its intimacy: This is a perfect opportunity to chat with the artist and learn what he was thinking when he painted that…. Art Can’s official visiting hours are from 4 to 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings (the show continues through November 3), but additional times are possible, at the artist’s discretion.
click to enlarge Pirate leads the way in 40 West for a Day of the Dead First Friday. - PIRATE: CONTEMPORARY ART
Pirate leads the way in 40 West for a Day of the Dead First Friday.
Pirate: Contemporary Art
Day of the Dead Community Celebration and Bob Luna Tribute
Through November 7
Celebration: Friday, November 5, 6 to 10 p.m.
Pirate: Contemporary Art, 7130 West 16th Avenue, Lakewood

The well-entrenched co-op’s nearly forty-year relationship with the Day of the Dead really caught fire when Pirate moved to Navajo Street, in the heart of the Northside and just blocks from the iconic Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. Pirate’s annual Día de los Muertos exhibition and celebration, never just an event for artists, survived its move to Lakewood a few years ago, still drawing in people from the neighborhood to participate. This year’s event will be a big comeback, in lockstep with the rest of the 40 West Art District, where First Friday will be all about honoring the dead with ofrendas, Day of the Dead-themed art, Aztec dancers, separate piñata parties for kids and adults, and the icing: a solemn and beautiful candlelight procession. For the coda, Pirate is planning a memorial for one of its own, dynamic artist Bob Luna, who passed away in July.
Deliberately strange art by Tim Cohen and Doug Spencer at Lane Meyer Projects. - TIM COHEN AND DOUG SPENCER
Deliberately strange art by Tim Cohen and Doug Spencer at Lane Meyer Projects.
Tim Cohen and Doug Spencer
Tim Cohen and Doug Spencer, Gum Gum Owl
Lane Meyer Projects, 2528 Walnut Street
Through December 5
Lane Meyer Projects pairs two artists creating odd storybook worlds where the endings aren’t alway good. Painter Tim Cohen’s work wears a childlike, naive look that almost overlooks the less innocent goings-on in a cheerful landscape of happy creatures and puffy green trees. Doug Spencer’s preferred medium is a mixture of candle smoke and magic involving shadowy, airbrushed stenciled shapes and edges of tinted resin.
click to enlarge Michelle Lamb, “Ferrum Avium,” mixed-media assemblage. - MICHELLE LAMB
Michelle Lamb, “Ferrum Avium,” mixed-media assemblage.
Michelle Lamb
Susie Biehl, Revived
Michelle Lamb, Pareidolia
Claudia Roulier, Moving On
Core New Art Space, Art Hub, 6851 West Colfax Avenue,
 Lakewood
Through November 7
Three shows at Core attack assemblage from different angles: Claudia Roulier comments on her move from her home state during the pandemic with a found-object sculpture series of giant turtles carrying whole houses, landscaping and assorted animals on their backs; Michelle Lamb brings a new collection of her glorious sculptures made of hardware, old graters, bicycle chains, model train tracks, typewriter parts and other random metal pieces; and Susie Biehl experiments with junk saved from the landfill to create fun, messy wall pieces.
Steven Shugart, “A Little Poem,” fluorescent light bulb, twigs, lamp holder, padauk, uranium glass beads, brass screws under black light. - STEVEN SHUGART
Steven Shugart, “A Little Poem,” fluorescent light bulb, twigs, lamp holder, padauk, uranium glass beads, brass screws under black light.
Steven Shugart
Stephen Shugart: Symbiotic
Faith Williams: Cyclical Forces: Explorations on the interconnected relationships of plants and pollinators
Edge Gallery, Art Hub, 6851 West Colfax Avenue,
 Lakewood
Through November 7
Core’s neighbor, Edge Gallery, will show off Steven Shugart’s clever light sculptures and constructions and an ecology-focused series by Faith Williams inspired by two weeks in Crested Butte doing field research at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. Her delicate mixed-media drawings depicting plant-pollinator relationships and the threats speeded up by climate change seem benign at first look but can carry a big punch.
click to enlarge Street photographer Juan Fuentes unveils a community photo-montage October 23 at Anythink Bennett. - JUAN FUENTES
Street photographer Juan Fuentes unveils a community photo-montage October 23 at Anythink Bennett.
Juan Fuentes
Juan Fuentes, Thirty-Six Miles East
BMoCA at Anythink Bennett, 495 Seventh Street, Bennett
Opening October 23
Wonderful Denver street photographer Juan Fuentes, keeper of the #olddenver hashtag on Instagram, spent the last few weeks on the eastern plains photographing and learning the stories of rural immigrant and Spanish-speaking communities around the town of Bennett who haven’t escaped the creeping urban development that’s pushing folks out of their neighborhoods and homes.
click to enlarge Jane Falkenberg, "Darkling: Gretel," oil on panel. - JANE FALKENBERG
Jane Falkenberg, "Darkling: Gretel," oil on panel.
Jane Falkenberg
Lisa Luree and Jane Falkenberg, Blessed Be
Valkarie Gallery, 445 South Saulsbury Street, Belmar, Lakewood
Through November 13
Jane Falkenberg’s portraits of nocturnal animal with glowing eyes and Lisa Luree’s fantasy works of skeletons, angels and mythical creatures rub elbows in a way that’s both funny and dark. It’s a good visual match-up in the season of things that go bump in the night.


ASLD Mask-Making for the Broadway Halloween Parade
ASLD Courtyard, Art Students League of Denver, 200 Grant Street
The Art Students League of Denver’s proximity to South Broadway makes it the perfect spot for a drop-in mask-making party before Saturday Night’s community-friendly Broadway Halloween Parade. Materials will be provided; join the ASLD in the courtyard until 5:30 p.m., the perfect time to start moseying down to Broadway. Costumes encouraged.
click to enlarge Colleen Tully, “I Was Only Dreaming.” - COLLEEN TULLY
Colleen Tully, “I Was Only Dreaming.”
Colleen Tully
Post Mortem: Art of the After Death
Artemesia Gallery, 836 Santa Fe Drive
Through January 7
Post-Mortem: An Afterlife Party: Saturday, October 23, 9 p.m., $25, RSVP at Eventbrite

Artemesia’s Post-Mortem show is not for kids. It’s a dark artistic portrayal of the dead running free in the spirit world that mixes Halloween, Samhain and Day of the Dead into a graveyard morass. It will suit horror-film fans, if you happen to be one; preview the show here. The opening will be followed by a ticketed Afterlife Party, where $25 gets you a late night of pagan revelry into the wee hours. Hallows Eve attire suggested.

Interested in having your event appear in this calendar? Send details to [email protected].
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