Art

Art Attack: Eleven Things for Gallery Lovers to Do in Denver

See work by CPAC member Stephanie Burchett in the gallery's annual members' show.
See work by CPAC member Stephanie Burchett in the gallery's annual members' show. Stephanie Burchett
Spark Gallery is a good starting point for lovers of local art this weekend: Denver’s longest-lived co-op gallery will kick off the first of two fortieth-anniversary exhibitions scheduled this summer, setting in motion a who’s-who look back at the venue’s revolving door of important Colorado artists. And Black Cube kicks off its summer project Monumental in the Denver Theatre district (find details about both in Westword’s 21 Best Things to Do in Denver). But plan to wander far and wide, for paeans to eyeballs and butcher shops, avant-garde artist books, a Colorado photography blockbuster and more as you take to the streets in search of good art.

click to enlarge Myah Mazcara's eyes have it at Sally Centigrade. - MYAH MAZCARA
Myah Mazcara's eyes have it at Sally Centigrade.
Myah Mazcara
Myah Mazcara, For Your Protection
Sally Centigrade Art Gallery, 445 South Saulsbury Street, Unit E, Lakewood
July 11 through 27
Opening Reception: Thursday, July 11, 5 to 9:30 p.m.

The eyes have it at Sally Centigrade, where Myah Mazcara will inundate a pink room with ever-vigilant eyeball sculptures that perhaps reveal the true meaning of “Big Brother is watching you.” There will be souvenirs, thanks to vending machines that spit out eyeballs and other arty trinkets for coin, along with new paintings by Mazcara, glittery skulls and other oddities.

click to enlarge Angel Espino, “Unraveled,” acrylic on canvas. - COURTESY OF ESPINO ARTE
Angel Espino, “Unraveled,” acrylic on canvas.
Courtesy of Espino Arte
Angel Espino, Unraveled
Unicom Capital, 1144 15th Street, 40th Floor
Thursday, July 11, 5 to 7 p.m.

Abstract painter Angel Espino has a giving soul to go with his artistic ability, as evidenced by his affiliation with Access Gallery as a mentor and teacher to the gallery’s membership of young adults living with disabilities. Half the proceeds from the sale of Espino’s Pollock-esque canvases (which you can see up close while enjoying the views from the fortieth-floor corporate offices of Unicom Capital) will benefit Access, so don’t be shy, art collectors.

click to enlarge Prime cuts from Kalindi DeFrancis's Meat Amigo installation at the Storeroom. - KALINDI DEFRANCIS
Prime cuts from Kalindi DeFrancis's Meat Amigo installation at the Storeroom.
Kalindi DeFrancis
Kalindi DeFrancis, Meat Amigo
The Storeroom, 1700 Vine Street
July 11 through August 31
Opening Reception: Thursday, July 11, 7 to 9 p.m.

The Storeroom, a storefront-window gallery attached to the Vine Street Pub & Brewery on 17th Avenue, continues its run of installations for window shoppers and lookie-loos with Meat Amigo, a surrealist butcher shop full of carved-sculpture cuts of meat created by Kalindi DeFrancis, who happens to have been raised a vegetarian. Meat and greet the artist at the opening party, or drop by any time through the end of August for a gander and a bloody good time.

click to enlarge An experimental film still from the work of Jean-Jacques Martinod. - JEAN-JACQUES MARTINOD
An experimental film still from the work of Jean-Jacques Martinod.
Jean-Jacques Martinod
Evidence Press and Films of Jean-Jacques Martinod
Counterpath, 7935 East 14th Avenue
Thursday, July 11, 8:30 p.m.

Bretta C. Walker and Jean-Jacques Martinod, the micro-publishers behind Evidence Press, a purveyor of artist-grade handmade chapbooks, are in residence at Counterpath, bringing a roadshow of new editions, including poet Rikki Ducornet’s "White Quetzal: From Orlando to Nice" and Walker’s own yet-to-be-released My Dirty Cunt & Me, the first in a planned photographic series. Martinod pitches in with a screening of a recent experimental film.

click to enlarge Go home with Carissa Samaniego and Matthew Smith at Union Hall. - MATTHEW SMITH, COURTESY OF UNION HALL
Go home with Carissa Samaniego and Matthew Smith at Union Hall.
Matthew Smith, courtesy of Union Hall
Carissa Samaniego and Matthew Smith, The Spirit in the Flame!
Union Hall Denver, 1750 Wewatta Street, Suite 144
Opening Reception: Friday, July 12, 5 to 8 p.m.
Artist Talk: Saturday, July 13, 1 to 2 p.m.

The new Union Hall, an event space and gallery within the Coloradan development near Union Station, dives in with its second show (and the first by Colorado artists), a collaborative exhibition by Carissa Samaniego and Matthew Smith, who revisit personal familiar places through symbolic objects, historical references and cultural markers. The duo will explain all in an artist talk on July 13.

click to enlarge Alice Stone Collins, "Air BNB." - ALICE STONE COLLINS
Alice Stone Collins, "Air BNB."
Alice Stone Collins
Breaking Ground
Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Avenue, Longmont
Opening Reception: Friday, July 12, 6 to 9 p.m.

Three artists — Alice Stone Collins, Saxon Martinez and Pam Rogers — muse on the concept of home through paintings, installation, and sculptures and drawings using materials from the botanical world, in an exhibition curated by Brandy Coons about literal structures that help shape our lives.

click to enlarge Tracy Stuckey, "Wounded Cowboy"  (after "Dead Toreador," 1864, by Édouard Manet), 2019, oil on canvas. - TRACY STUCKEY, COURTESY OF VISIONS WEST CONTEMPORARY
Tracy Stuckey, "Wounded Cowboy" (after "Dead Toreador," 1864, by Édouard Manet), 2019, oil on canvas.
Tracy Stuckey, courtesy of Visions West Contemporary
Mountain Standard Time
Visions West Contemporary, 2605 Walnut Street
July 12 through August 31
Opening Reception: Friday, July 12, 6 p.m.
As part of Visions West’s multi-gallery, chain-wide summer show Mountain Standard Time, the Denver outpost presents work addressing the West from every angle by Beau Carey, Jennifer Nehrbass, Tracy Stuckey and others. What does the West mean to you? The artists delve into the region’s many facets.

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Susan Froyd started writing for Westword as the "Thrills" editor in 1992 and never quite left the fold. These days she still freelances for the paper in addition to walking her dogs, enjoying cheap ethnic food and reading voraciously. Sometimes she writes poetry.
Contact: Susan Froyd