Art

Ten Things for Art Lovers to Do and See this Weekend in Denver

Shorts and the Birdseed Collective present a new exhibit by Ian Ferguson on July 1.
Shorts and the Birdseed Collective present a new exhibit by Ian Ferguson on July 1. Ian Ferguson
As we head into July 4, this is kind of a holiday weekend, but the galleries are so busy, you’d think it was First Friday. They're offering a compelling lineup of shows, with an interesting spread of work and mediums and ideas worth thinking about. Kiss June goodbye in style at these ten art events:
click to enlarge Artworks by Glen Moriwaki, Michael Brohman and C. Maxx Stevens examine oppression of minority groups for A Place in History. - FIREHOUSE ART CENTER, LONGMONT
Artworks by Glen Moriwaki, Michael Brohman and C. Maxx Stevens examine oppression of minority groups for A Place in History.
Firehouse Art Center, Longmont
A Place in History
Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Avenue, Longmont
June 27 through July 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 13, 6 to 9 p.m.
Three artists — Michael Brohman, Glen Moriwaki and C. Maxx Stevens — explore their relationships to three marginalized social strata in A Place in History, a hard-hitting exhibit at Firehouse with a sub-theme of human oppression. Each artist has a different story to tell: Brohman opens the book on his formative years as a gay youth raised within a biased religious group, while Californian Moriwaki addresses his Japanese parents’ internment in a Wyoming camp during WWII by juxtaposing visuals inspired by imprisonment and freedom, and Native artist Stevens comments on stereotyping on both sides of the divide from a personal point of view.

click to enlarge Artist Nicole Banowetz talks art and science with DAVA youth. - DAVA
Artist Nicole Banowetz talks art and science with DAVA youth.
DAVA
Micro Cosmos
Downtown Aurora Visual Arts, 1405 Florence Street, Aurora
June 28 through August 31
Opening Reception: Thursday, June 28, 4 to 7 p.m.

Nicole Banowetz’s inflatable installations, which blow up microscopic life forms to monumental size, provide a perfect portal for DAVA’s mission to blend usable job skills and art in an art-mentoring program for at-risk youth. For Micro Cosmos, Banowetz helped students navigate the science/art connection, resulting in installations of Petri dishes and growing cells by older kids, and microscopic shapes drawn by the younger set. It will all go on view Thursday, with Banowetz’s inflatables setting the scene, including several pop-up one-night-only works displayed outdoors during the opening reception. The spectacle is real, as are the lessons learned by the eager youth clientele at DAVA.

click to enlarge Taiko Chandler takes manipulated art materials to new heights  at Republic Plaza. - TAIKO CHANDLER, ARTS BROOKFIELD
Taiko Chandler takes manipulated art materials to new heights at Republic Plaza.
Taiko Chandler, Arts Brookfield
Manipulated: cut…folded…molded
Republic Plaza, 370 17th Street
June 28 through August 15
Opening Reception: Thursday, June 28, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

If you’ve ever taken a scrap of paper and, without thinking, started folding it up in accordion shapes or little triangles, you’ve experienced the foundation of manipulated art. Of course, it’s more complicated when artists like Taiko Chandler, who prints and shapes sheets of Tyvek for large wall installations, start manipulating materials into non-traditional shapes. Chandler, who’s contributed a site-specific piece for the show, will be joined by fifteen other local artists versed in the art of manipulated mediums for Manipulated: cut…folded…molded, a downtown-Denver exhibit mounted by Arts Brookfield in the Republic Plaza lobby and concourse levels.

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Contact: Susan Froyd