4

Margaret Brown Became a Legend. Now She's a Bobblehead.

Margaret Brown Became a Legend. Now She's a Bobblehead.
National Bobblehead Hall of Fame
^
Keep Westword Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free.

Margaret Brown may have been unsinkable, but her head's a little unsteady.

Then again, she's looking pretty good for 152.

Margaret Tobin was born on July 18, 1967, in Hannibal, Missouri. To mark her birthday, the Molly Brown House Museum today is launching a limited-edition bobblehead honoring the woman who came to be known as the Unsinkable Molly Brown.

She never used the nickname "Molly" (that came courtesy the Broadway musical that debuted in 1960). She gained the Brown when she married mining engineer John Brown in Leadville, where she was seeking her fortune and he struck it rich. In 1894, they moved to the Victorian mansion at 1340 Pennsylvania Street in Denver that was saved from destruction in the early ’70s by the first campaign of what would become Historic Denver.

Margaret Brown was honored for her actions on the Titanic.
Margaret Brown was honored for her actions on the Titanic.
Molly Brown House Museum

While the Browns were largely shunned by Denver society, Margaret held her head up high and engaged in numerous good works. She gained the "Unsinkable" title after she not only survived the Titanic disaster, but kept up the spirits of those in her lifeboat.

Only 500 Molly Brown bobbleheads were created in a collaboration between the Molly Brown House Museum and the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame; they're selling for $20 at the museum and the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame website.

Happy birthday, Margaret. And chin up: You're looking good for 152.

Keep Westword Free... Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Denver with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Westword community and help support independent local journalism in Denver.

 

Join the Westword community and help support independent local journalism in Denver.