After a certain point, running around a field blowing away your buddies just isn't enough. Even the most dedicated sniper craves variety. Action Pursuit Paintball offers four separate killing fields to hold your interest. The main field encompasses nearly 24 acres and is dotted not only with the standard sand and hay bunkers, but also realistic replicas of World War II landing craft, à la Saving Private Ryan. In addition, there are three smaller tournament arenas for one's shooting pleasure. The first has large, colorful, inflatable bunkers in different shapes. Another is dotted with the lower-tech -- but still classic -- cable spools. The third is the "Brazilian field," which features large, thin, movable obstacles that make a loud, pleasing thwack! when blasted.

After a certain point, running around a field blowing away your buddies just isn't enough. Even the most dedicated sniper craves variety. Action Pursuit Paintball offers four separate killing fields to hold your interest. The main field encompasses nearly 24 acres and is dotted not only with the standard sand and hay bunkers, but also realistic replicas of World War II landing craft, à la Saving Private Ryan. In addition, there are three smaller tournament arenas for one's shooting pleasure. The first has large, colorful, inflatable bunkers in different shapes. Another is dotted with the lower-tech -- but still classic -- cable spools. The third is the "Brazilian field," which features large, thin, movable obstacles that make a loud, pleasing thwack! when blasted.

Best Locally Owned Racehorse That Flies

Reraise

We are not talking $5,000 claimers here -- the manes-and-tails that run at Arapahoe Park. Reraise, majority-owned by Denver rock promoter (and longtime student of the breed) Barry Fey, is what racetrack people call a "freak" -- an animal that regularly runs faster than anyone thinks possible. In November 1998, Reraise beat the best sprinters in the world in the top-of-the-line Breeders Cup Sprint at Churchill Downs and won the prestigious Eclipse Award for sprinter of the year. Despite a long convalescence from minor injuries, which could make for an uncertain 2001 schedule, the speedster is still considered one of the top ten turf sprinters. Giddyap.

Best Locally Owned Racehorse That Flies

Reraise

We are not talking $5,000 claimers here -- the manes-and-tails that run at Arapahoe Park. Reraise, majority-owned by Denver rock promoter (and longtime student of the breed) Barry Fey, is what racetrack people call a "freak" -- an animal that regularly runs faster than anyone thinks possible. In November 1998, Reraise beat the best sprinters in the world in the top-of-the-line Breeders Cup Sprint at Churchill Downs and won the prestigious Eclipse Award for sprinter of the year. Despite a long convalescence from minor injuries, which could make for an uncertain 2001 schedule, the speedster is still considered one of the top ten turf sprinters. Giddyap.

Skinner Middle School
Meteorologists are made, not born. Seventh-graders at Skinner get the chance to not only give morning weather reports but also do serious scientific data gathering, thanks to the state-of-the-art weather station on the roof of the school. One of only six in the country donated by Canadian climatologist Reese Halter, founder of Global Forest, the weather station monitors everything from rainfall and snowfall accumulations to ultraviolet radiation and heat stress. The students download the data weekly and transfer it to Global Forest's site, where it's analyzed by scientists at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. The forecast is sunny.

Meteorologists are made, not born. Seventh-graders at Skinner get the chance to not only give morning weather reports but also do serious scientific data gathering, thanks to the state-of-the-art weather station on the roof of the school. One of only six in the country donated by Canadian climatologist Reese Halter, founder of Global Forest, the weather station monitors everything from rainfall and snowfall accumulations to ultraviolet radiation and heat stress. The students download the data weekly and transfer it to Global Forest's site, where it's analyzed by scientists at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. The forecast is sunny.

Colorado ski areas present an embarrassment of riches for the downhill crowd, but a mind-bending, knee-breaking bump run at Arapahoe Basin called Pallavicini deserves special mention. Named for an Austrian nobleman who was also a skiing pioneer, it's a broad field of daunting moguls piled up on a forty-degree pitch for more than a quarter mile -- a challenge that only the most daring hotdoggers take up. Reach the bottom in one piece, and you've quite a story to tell. Fair warning: No skier over 35 need apply.

Colorado ski areas present an embarrassment of riches for the downhill crowd, but a mind-bending, knee-breaking bump run at Arapahoe Basin called Pallavicini deserves special mention. Named for an Austrian nobleman who was also a skiing pioneer, it's a broad field of daunting moguls piled up on a forty-degree pitch for more than a quarter mile -- a challenge that only the most daring hotdoggers take up. Reach the bottom in one piece, and you've quite a story to tell. Fair warning: No skier over 35 need apply.

Sure, we all love skiing and boarding the Rockies. It's the expense that gets us down -- fuel, lift tickets, parking, lunch, equipment rental and so on. Thankfully, Copper Mountain eased the pain this season: It offered four full-day lift tickets (with only a handful of blackout days) for a measly $49, which is what you generally pay for one ticket. The "pass" was actually a credit card that you could slip into your wallet or purse, and it was good for the entire season. (Copper also offered a quartet of spring-skiing lift tickets at half the price.) The popular passes sold out faster than it takes to blaze a black-diamond run, so we hope Copper gives us a repeat performance next season.
Sure, we all love skiing and boarding the Rockies. It's the expense that gets us down -- fuel, lift tickets, parking, lunch, equipment rental and so on. Thankfully, Copper Mountain eased the pain this season: It offered four full-day lift tickets (with only a handful of blackout days) for a measly $49, which is what you generally pay for one ticket. The "pass" was actually a credit card that you could slip into your wallet or purse, and it was good for the entire season. (Copper also offered a quartet of spring-skiing lift tickets at half the price.) The popular passes sold out faster than it takes to blaze a black-diamond run, so we hope Copper gives us a repeat performance next season.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of