Marijuana

Denver Marijuana Deliveries Near the Starting Line

Strawberry Fields owns five dispensaries throughout Colorado.
Strawberry Fields owns five dispensaries throughout Colorado. Courtesy of Strawberry Fields
Permits have been issued, contracts are in place, and the cars are ready to go. Marijuana delivery is revving up in Denver.

Marijuana delivery service Doobba LLC and dispensary Strawberry Fields have both been approved for pot deliveries in Denver, according to the city Department of Excise and Licenses. The companies have been vocal about their desire to work together, and Doobba owners Ari and Karina Cohen are optimistic they'll have the agreements finalized and cars on the road "in a couple of weeks," according to Ari.

"I think there's a lot of excitement. It's new, and there's always figuring out different parts of the puzzle with something big and new like this," he says. "We could do a delivery tomorrow or Monday, but is that launching in a proper way? Probably not."

The Cohens were the first to apply for a delivery permit through Denver's new marijuana licensing program. That system, approved by Denver City Council in April, reserves new business licenses through 2027 for applicants who qualify under a new state social equity designation. The system, meant to repair harms to communities impacted by the War on Drugs, prioritizes Colorado residents who were arrested for or convicted of drug offenses or were subject to civil asset forfeiture related to a drug investigation; anyone with a family member who suffered from drug-related offenses is also eligible.


Ari was arrested for marijuana possession with intent to distribute while in his twenties, so he qualifies for the city's program. "I was shocked we were the first application, honestly, but luck favors the prepared," he says.

Under Denver's marijuana delivery rules, both dispensaries and third-party services such as Doobba can deliver marijuana orders, but dispensaries can only do so if their ownership qualifies under the social equity provision. If they don't, the stores must partner with a third-party transporter.

Marijuana purchases can only be delivered to residential addresses, and those placing the order will have to show their IDs to the delivery driver. Deliveries will be limited to 1 ounce of flower, 8 grams of concentrate, or edibles containing 800 milligrams of THC, and can be paid in cash or credit card, but only in person or through third-party payment systems.

Strawberry Fields announced its intention to partner with Doobba earlier this week, and the Cohens have been talking with Seed & Smith and L'Eagle dispensaries about delivery agreements as well, according to Ari, though neither store has yet been approved by the city.

Similar to food-delivery businesses, Doobba would provide a platform where dispensary customers could request a delivery from its own website or a partnering dispensary's website or menu service, such as Weedmaps, Jane or Dutchie.

Originally projected for a fall launch, Denver's marijuana delivery permits were issued faster than the Cohens or Strawberry Fields expected. The city had anticipated a deluge of applications, but has only received a handful in the month since Excise and Licenses began accepting them. Aurora, the first town with dispensaries to allow recreational pot delivery, has also reported underwhelming results.

Aurora dispensaries and marijuana delivery software firms like Lantern say they're hoping that Denver's rollout will make more customers aware of the new delivery option, and Ari believes more stores will jump in once delivery is a proven moneymaker.

"I think everyone is looking at it from their own lens. We look at it as a delivery company, they're all looking at it from a dispensary lens, and brands are looking at it in their own way," he says. "I wouldn't say this process was easy, but it's very well laid out."

Marijuana purchases can only be delivered to residential addresses, and those placing orders will have to show ID to the delivery driver. Deliveries will be limited to 1 ounce of flower, 8 grams of concentrate, or edibles containing 800 milligrams of THC, and can be paid in cash or credit card, but only in person or through third-party payment systems.
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Thomas Mitchell has written about all things cannabis for Westword since 2014, covering sports, real estate and general news along the way for publications such as the Arizona Republic, Inman and Fox Sports. He's currently the cannabis editor for westword.com.
Contact: Thomas Mitchell