Crime

Denver's Autumn of Violence: Two Monday Morning Shootings Add to Bloodshed

One of the shootings took place near the intersection of East Evans and Broadway.
One of the shootings took place near the intersection of East Evans and Broadway. Google Maps
In 2021, Denver experienced a summer of violence on par with the 1993 season during which the phrase originated. But now the city has moved into an autumn of violence, possibly aggravated by Indian Summer temperatures and a growing frustration over pandemic-related problems.

Overnight, the Denver Police Department has reported two shootings and a stabbing.

The stabbing came first. According to the DPD, at 12:41 a.m. today, October 18, officers responded to a report of a stabbing near the intersection of East Evans Avenue and Broadway. An adult male was transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Less than an hour later, at 1:27 a.m., officers were called to the 5700 block of North Ceylon Street on a report of shooting. The adult victim was taken to the hospital and is said to be in stable condition.


Then, at 4:46 a.m., department personnel tweeted about a shooting near West Second Avenue and Santa Fe Drive. Once again, an adult male was hospitalized for injuries not considered life-threatening.

The Denver Crime Map maintained by the DPD shows 322 violent crimes — defined as murder, robbery and/or aggravated assault — from the first day of fall, September 22, through Friday, October 16, the most recent date for which statistics are available.

This total includes six murders. Four are categorized as "homicide by other means: on September 29 at 2285 South Marion Street; on October 7 at an unlisted address; on October 8, also at an unspecified setting; and on October 9 at 7355 East 22nd Avenue. The other two are characterized as "homicide by a family member": on September 25 at 3240 South Utica Street and on October 11, in an event not yet tied to a location.

During this time span, eight Denver neighborhoods have experienced the most violence as measured by crime density — the number of crimes per square mile. Six of the neighborhoods are in central Denver, with one in east Denver and one in west Denver.


Here they are, in ascending order:

Westwood
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 13
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 8.68 per square mile

Five Points
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 17
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 9.67 per square mile

East Colfax
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 14
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 13.10 per square mile

Civic Center
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 4
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 13.16 per square mile

North Capitol Hill
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 8
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 22.66 per square mile

Capitol Hill
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 17
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 25.15 per square mile

Union Station
Violent Offense Count September 22-October 16: 12
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 27.34 per square mile

Central Business District (CBD)
Violent Offense County September 22-October 16: 17
Violent Crime Density September 22-October 16: 39.44 per square mile

And judging by the way this week is starting, those numbers could keep growing. In addition to the three violent incidents this morning, the DPD is also investigating two shootings on October 17: in the 2700 block of South Jay Street and at East 33rd Avenue/North Vine Street. If you have information about any of these crimes, phone Metro Denver Crime Stoppers at 720-913 STOP (7867).
KEEP WESTWORD FREE... Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts