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Photos: Here's Where the Laziest People in Colorado (Supposedly) Live


Last month, we highlighted Estately data that showed Colorado has the second-fewest couch potatoes of any state in the country, trailing only Hawaii.

But according to the folks at Find the Best.com, there are still quite a few Coloradans who aren't working up a sweat during their leisure time — and they're mostly found in rural locations.

The rankings are based on a survey that asked the following question: “During the past month, other than your regular job, did you participate in any physical activities or exercises such as running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking for exercise?”

Of course, jobs on ranches and farms are often so physically taxing that by the end of the day, lots of folks are too exhausted to hit the links or do yoga — and that may call the results into question.

Decide for yourself by counting down the top ten, followed by two heat maps: one measuring each Colorado county by its activity level and the other offering a national perspective in which Colorado does indeed stand out for not being dominated by couch potatoes.

Number 10:
Las Animas County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 20.7%

Number 9:
Lincoln County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 20.8%

Number 8:
Prowers County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 21.4%

Number 7:
Crowley County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 21.4%

Number 6:
Moffat County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 21.8%

Number 5:
Bent County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 22.4%

Number 4:
Costilla County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 23.3%

Number 3:
Cheyenne County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 23.9%

Number 2:
Yuma County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 24.1%

Number 1:
Kit Carson County, CO
Physically inactive percentage: 25.4%
Where Physically Inactive People live in Colorado | FindTheBest
Physically Inactive People in The United States | FindTheBest
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Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts

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