Ten things you didn't know about Lakeside Amusement Park in Lakeside, Colorado

One of Lakeside's most famous rides, the Wild Chipmunk.
One of Lakeside's most famous rides, the Wild Chipmunk.
Courtesy of Tom Lundin/The Denver Eye.

More than just a spot to enjoy an inexpensive evening of roller-coaster rides and soft-serve ice cream, Lakeside Amusement Park is a place packed with living history. Built in 1908, the beautiful park has stood the test of time -- and in some areas within its gates, time has actually stood still -- retaining much of the end-of-the-Victorian-era charm that makes it a unique summertime destination for locals and visitors.

We can give you a million reasons why you should visit Colorado's oldest amusement park before the season is over, but instead we've compiled a list of some not-so-well-known facts about one of the area's most mysterious, most fascinating summer attractions.

See also: The Denver Eye's Tom Lundin talks mid-century modern and Lakeside's Masonic roots

Ten things you didn't know about Lakeside Amusement Park in Lakeside, Colorado

10) Lakeside was opened as White City in 1908, one of many amusement parks with the same name and architectural style across the country

Built in the Beaux Arts style of the Chicago World's Fair of 1893, Lakeside was once known as "White City." It boasted hundreds of thousands of twinkling lights across its acres of park. The former formal entrance on Sheridan used to greet visitors with the still-standing "Tower of Jewels," which was once ablaze with 16,000 individual bulbs.

The park is still on the original plot of land (the same can't be said for Elitch Gardens, the only other amusement park in the area), and many of the original 1908 structures and buildings remain -- which is a rarity for a park of its age. Supposedly, there were dozens of White Cities built across the country at the turn of the last century, and Lakeside is said to be last remaining amusement park of this style.

Ten things you didn't know about Lakeside Amusement Park in Lakeside, Colorado
Courtesy of the Western History and Genealogy blog of the Denver Public Library

9) Since Lakeside opened in 1908, it has only changed hands once

The park was developed by prominent Denver Brewer Adolph Zang and F.J. Kirshoff at the turn of the last century and then sold to Ben Krasner in the 1930s. Krasner's daughter Rhoda Krasner -- who is the namesake of the body of water the park sits on because her father renamed it upon purchase -- still runs the park today. Keep reading for eight more things you don't know about Lakeside.


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