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Harvey Morrow convicted of murdering legendary Denver DJ Steven B. Williams

Back in the '80s, Steven B. Williams was among the hottest celebs in Denver -- half of KBPI's radio tandem Steven B. and the Hawk, which won multiple Westword Best of Denver awards. But in 2006, he was found dead in the waters off Santa Catalina Island, one bullet in his head. Now, finally, ex-stockbroker Harvey Morrow has been found guilty of committing the crime.

The motive, predictably, was money -- not cash Williams earned during his radio heyday, but about $2 million he reportedly inherited from his father's estate.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Morrow told Williams he was a New York investment banker who'd known his dad -- and before long, the jock, who'd been making his living doing voiceover work in SoCal prior to landing in the chips, asked him to set up a trust fund.

Once he had access to these funds, prosecutors said, Morrow began lifting sizable chunks of it for his own purposes, including to fix up a yacht with a fireplace and electronic gadgetry whose cost topped six figures. He also allegedly transferred loot directly into his own bank accounts.

For a while, the pair remained pals; they lived together and planned an around-the-world sailing trip. But somewhere along the line, Williams began to wonder if he was being bilked and talked about confronting Morrow.

Then , in May 2006, shortly after being seen at a marina, Williams vanished. When his body was found, authorities estimated that he'd been in the water for two weeks.

Before this gruesome discovery, Morrow told the curious that Steven B. had moved to Hawaii. Then he disappeared, too. His destination was Great Falls, Montana, where he landed a job at a car dealership. There, he told a co-worker, Joe Parsetich, that he'd moved inland because his wife had died in a tragic boating accident, and he wanted to get as far from the ocean as he could.

Mistake: Parsetich was an ex-cop, and when he did a web search to find out if the tale was true, he stumbled upon a Denver TV station report naming Morrow a person of interest in Williams's slaying. He then contacted authorities, who subsequently busted Morrow.

Five years later, Morrow, now 60, was finally convicted of murder for financial gain. At his December 16 sentencing, he'll face the prospect of life in prison without the possibility of parole -- and sans the prospects of spiffing up that yacht.

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