Art

Art Attack: Twelve of the Best Things for Gallery Lovers to See and Do This Week in Denver

Heidi Jung, “Rambling Rose,” Sumi ink and charcoal on Mylar, mounted on panel.
Heidi Jung, “Rambling Rose,” Sumi ink and charcoal on Mylar, mounted on panel. Heidi Jung, Michael Warren Contemporary
What’s your fancy? A last summer drive in the mountains with a side of art? A tuneup for Denver’s digital-animation immersion festival? Engaging in French social traditions with artists? These are just a few of the opportunities this weekend holds for metro-area art lovers. Here are twelve suggestions:

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Experience the Supernova DigiLounge at Next Stage Gallery.
Denver Digerati
Supernova DigiLounge
Next Stage Gallery, Denver Performing Arts Complex Galleria
Through November 23
Open Tuesdays through Fridays, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays, 12:30 through 7:30 p.m.
Supernova Launch Party: Friday, September 20, 7 to 9 p.m.

The Supernova DigiLounge officially opened earlier this week at Next Stage, a gallery operated by CU Denver’s College of Arts & Media that occupies a niche at the Denver Performing Arts Complex. The immersive space will serve as a home-base hangout and relaxation station for the upcoming Supernova Digital Animation Festival in the Denver Theatre District, and will host a September 20 Friday-night fest launch party where you try out Supernova before the intensive, ten-hour fest rolls out the next day. Even better, the DigiLounge will be available to theater-goers and music lovers at the complex through November 23. Take a load off and dive into virtual reality.

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Trine Bumiller captured details from nature for This Land at the Denver Central Library.
Trine Bumiller
Trine Bumiller, This Land
Fifth Floor Western History Art Gallery, Denver Central Library, 10 West Fourteenth Avenue
Through December 12

Inspired by the patterns and textures of nature, painter Trine Bumiller is known for capturing details of the landscape in what she calls visual “distillations” of natural shapes, colors and forms. This Land comprises paintings and watercolors brought back from on-site explorations of national parks and monuments, and it’s perfectly placed in the Denver Central Library’s fifth-floor Western History Art Gallery.

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Altar'd Continuum rethinks the significance of altars at the Museo.
Museo de las Americas
Altar'd Continuum: Resistance and Empowerment in Sacred Spaces
Museo de las Americas, 861 Santa Fe Drive
September 12 through February 1
Thursday, September 12, 6 to 9 p.m.

The Museo heads in new directions with Altar’d Continuum: Resistance and Empowerment in Sacred Spaces, a group show that updates the tradition and spiritual power of altar-building in counterpoint to traditional works from the museum’s own collection.

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Lex Thompson, “Portrait of Mabel Maxwell c. 1868-1869,” 2016.
Lex Thompson
The Unbearable Impermanence of Things
Vicki Myhren Gallery, 2121 East Asbury Avenue
September 13 through December 1
Opening Reception: Thursday, September 12, 5 to 8 p.m.

Curator Libby Barbee gathered work by fourteen artists who work concepts of naturalism and impermanence into their personal aesthetic for the Myhren Gallery’s fall show, which investigates how nature, always shifting, can never be fully captured, changed or put under glass. Expect beautiful observations that will make you feel like a small dot in the universe.
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