Arts and Culture

Five Things You Didn't Know About the Sculptures in Denver's Burns Park

Burns Park fills the triangle of hillside defined by Colorado Boulevard to the west, Alameda Avenue to the south and Leetsdale Drive, which runs diagonally from northwest to southeast. The park is notable for being home to a suite of mostly minimalist sculptures, some of which have been on the site since 1968. This Saturday, August 9, there will be a festival at Burns Park called Experience 1968, which is free and open to the public. In addition to celebrating the existing pieces, the event features six artists --Trine Bumiller, Claudia Mastrobuono, Nicole Banowetz, Matt Scobey, Nikki Pike and Tara Rynders - -who will be creating temporary works, performances and music in honor of Burns Park and what's happened there in the intervening years. The event, sponsored by Denver Arts & Venues, runs in the park from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; tickets are free and may be ordered online, but I've got a feeling you could just show up.

And now, five things you may not know about Burns Park.

See also: A Love Letter to Denver, the City I Used to Know

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Michael Paglia is an art historian and writer whose columns have appeared in Westword since 1995; his essays on the visual arts have also been published in national periodicals including Art News, Architecture, Art Ltd., Modernism, Art & Auction and Sculpture Magazine. He taught art history at the University of Colorado Denver.
Contact: Michael Paglia