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Coloradans Who Are and Aren't (Yet) Charged in U.S. Capitol Breach

A partially pixelated photo of a man on the U.S. Capitol grounds on January 6 and an image of Glenn Wes Lee Croy inside the building on the same day, from the criminal complaint against him.EXPAND
A partially pixelated photo of a man on the U.S. Capitol grounds on January 6 and an image of Glenn Wes Lee Croy inside the building on the same day, from the criminal complaint against him.
Front Range Antifa/U.S. Justice Department
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In testimony before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday, March 2, FBI director Christopher Wray revealed that his agency is chasing at least 2,000 domestic terrorism cases, including many related to the January 6 breach of the U.S. Capitol — and he confirmed that the FBI's investigation of that event has found no evidence of involvement by Antifa members.

Shortly before Wray's testimony, the group Front Range Antifa published a post contending that a local north metro businessman had been present at the siege, bolstering its argument with a series of compelling photos and screen captures.

Westword shared the post with the U.S. Attorney's Office in Colorado. "The U.S. Attorney’s Office received this information from a few media outlets and forwarded it to the appropriate investigative authority," confirms spokesperson J. Chris Larson. But that doesn't mean the Department of Justice will criminally charge the man, unlike at least five Coloradans to date, including Colorado Springs resident Glenn Wes Lee Croy, the latest to be named in an official complaint.

Why not? The document filed against Croy is filled with specific corroboration that he was actually inside the Capitol building on January 6. In contrast, the images from the Antifa post about the businessman, who hasn't responded to multiple outreach efforts by Westword, all show him outside on the Capitol grounds. That's not definitive proof that he broke any laws (which is why we're not naming him at this point and have disguised his identity in the photo at the top of this post).

As for the Croy complaint, updated on February 28, he's responsible for much of the information placing him inside the Capitol. In a Facebook Messenger conversation with an individual referred to as "Witness 1," he wrote, "I was there," and underscored his claim with a photo of himself and another male, Terry Lynn Lindsey, standing in front of "Lincoln the Legislator," a famous bust of Abraham Lincoln that was on display in the Capitol that day. Croy and Lindsey are Facebook friends.

Another image of Glenn Wes Lee Croy from the U.S. Justice Department criminal complaint in his name.
Another image of Glenn Wes Lee Croy from the U.S. Justice Department criminal complaint in his name.
U.S. Department of Justice

Additionally, the FBI obtained body-camera footage from the Metropolitan Police Department, a Washington, D.C., law enforcement agency that responded to the riot, showing Croy inside the Capitol rotunda. Also noted is Croy's response to a tweet by Representative Lauren Boebert. After she tweeted, "Who is going to be in DC on January 6th to stand with President Donald Trump?," he replied, "fellow Coloradan will be there."

A video shared on Parler featured Croy, too, as did pics from Lindsey, who captioned one with this assertion: "Notice how peaceful we were inside the Capitol. Don’t believe the news we didn’t start shit." But as the complaint points out, it's a federal crime to "knowingly enter or remain in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority to do so and...knowingly, and with intent to impede or disrupt the orderly conduct of Government."

There's little doubt the businessman in the Antifa post was nearby. Although the lower half of his face is covered with a mask, the part that's visible matches a portrait on his company's website — and he's wearing a jacket with his firm's logo on it. If investigators identify images of this man taken inside the Capitol, charges could indeed be filed, as they were against Colorado Springs realtor Klete Keller, a former Olympic swimmer who was wearing a distinctive U.S. Olympic team jacket on January 6.

But given the volume of cases figuratively on the FBI's desk right now, the investigation has a long way to go. In the meantime, cases have already been filed against Keller, Woodland Park's Robert Gieswein, Littleton's Patrick Montgomery and Denver's Jeffery Sabol, as well as Croy.

Click to read Glenn Wes Lee Croy's criminal complaint.

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