All aboard...for now.
All aboard...for now.
Danielle Lirette

Reader: Everyone's So Sentimental About the Old Spaghetti Factory

The Old Spaghetti Factory in downtown Denver is about to reach the end of the line. On September 16, the noodle emporium at 1215 18th Street will close for good; the company, founded by Gus Dussin in Portland, Oregon, in 1969, is pulling out of downtown because it was unable to negotiate a new lease deal in a part of town that was a dump when the restaurant opened 45 years ago and is now booming.

Fans of the place can take solace in the fact that the Westminster location of the Old Spaghetti Factory that opened last year ago will remain open. And others can chew over their remembrance of things pasta.

Says J.D.: 

Sad, but it’s my fault because I haven’t been there in thirty years.

Replies Theresa:

Not sad. They had terrible food.

 Adds April: 

Sorry, but it was gross. It was like Ragu Italian. Nasty.

 Suggests Michael: 

The Old Spaghetti Factory's setting would have made a better nightclub over a restaurant. There's something about drinking in a box car that seems appealing.

 Concludes Tom: 

Everyone seems so sentimental????

Keep reading for more coverage of the Old Spaghetti Factory.

Reader: Everyone's So Sentimental About the Old Spaghetti Factory (2)
Danielle Lirette

"The Old Spaghetti Factory Is Closing Downtown"

Reader: Everyone's So Sentimental About the Old Spaghetti Factory (4)EXPAND
Danielle Lirette

"Photos: Behind the Scenes at the Old Spaghetti Factory"

Reader: Everyone's So Sentimental About the Old Spaghetti Factory (5)EXPAND
Danielle Lirette

"Five Things You May Not Know About the Old Spaghetti Factory"

Reader: Everyone's So Sentimental About the Old Spaghetti Factory (3)
Danielle Lirette

"Review: Remembrance of Things Pasta at the Old Spaghetti Factory"

While the Old Spaghetti Factory isn't a Denver original, it has been an integral part of the downtown dining scene for generations and is one of a dwindling number of red-sauce joints in town. Three years ago, in her review of the place, Gretchen Kurtz asked this: "How is the Old Spaghetti Factory able to survive in a juiced-up food scene that sees hundreds of new restaurants a year?"

The answer? Cheap and familiar food in a fun setting for both kids and adults. But the "juiced-up" dining scene has only continued to grow; low prices, a family-friendly atmosphere and a generic menu weren't enough to save the eatery from the growing competition downtown, where landlords know someone else is always willing to pay a premium for a space.

Where else can Denver turn for a taste of nostalgia? See our list of six old-school Italian restaurants that have surpassed the fifty-year mark.

Do you have memories of the Old Spaghetti Factory? Share them in a comment or e-mail cafe@westword.com.

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