Art

Fifteen Ways for Art Lovers to Kick Off Denver Arts Week

Nina Tichava, “Float Feather Primary Combined,” 2018, painting and collage on panel.
Nina Tichava, “Float Feather Primary Combined,” 2018, painting and collage on panel. Nina Tichava, K Contemporary
When First Friday collides with Denver Arts Week on Friday, November 2, it will create an explosion of exhibition openings, $52.80 art deals at galleries all over town and, as it happens, Día de los Muertos street celebrations connected to artwalks in the Santa Fe Drive and 40 West arts districts. On Saturday, November 3, take advantage of DAW’s Night at the Museums to visit the Denver Art Museum, the Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, the Clyfford Still Museum and the Byers-Evans House Museum gallery in the Golden Triangle, as well as the close-by Museo de las Americas, all for free. You’ll also find plenty of art to explore in RiNo and other regional art districts. But just in case you’re still confused about where you want to land this weekend, here are some standout stops.

click to enlarge Modern silver spoons by Kim Harrell. - KIM HARRELL
Modern silver spoons by Kim Harrell.
Kim Harrell
Kim Harrell, Back to the Garden
Mai Wyn Fine Art, 744 Santa Fe Drive
November 1 through December 1
Preview Reception: Thursday, November 1, 6 to 8 p.m.
First Friday Reception: Friday, November 2, 5 to 10 p.m.

Silversmith Kim Harrell might be best known for her stunning, bare-bones sterling-silver jewelry set with an occasional gemstone, but she also delves into sculpture and ultra-modern functional pieces, from kitchen spoons and bubble-blowers to impossibly smart-looking articles she calls “moon bowls,” all of them almost too fine to use. She’ll be showing off a variety of objects in her first fully solo show at Mai Wyn, and you can catch the exhibition while it’s fresh this weekend during two nights of receptions, with or without a crowd.

click to enlarge Margaret Pettee Olsen, “Information Under Fire,” 2017, synthetic polymer and reflective pigment on canvas. - MARGARET PETTEE OLSEN
Margaret Pettee Olsen, “Information Under Fire,” 2017, synthetic polymer and reflective pigment on canvas.
Margaret Pettee Olsen
Relay: Paintings by Margaret Pettee Olsen
808 Projects, 808 Santa Fe Drive
November 1 through 30
Opening Reception: Thursday, November 1, 6 to 8 p.m.

Margaret Pettee Olsen, an abstract painter with a background in limited-edition lithography, brings a printmaker’s ethos into her work, which consists of polymer-layered canvases that are painted in broadly brushed swaths of organic tangles, drips and markings she calls “edits.” See Olsen’s latest at this exhibition curated by Denver art writer Stephanie Grilli.

See Día de los Muertos-inspired art by Tony Ortega and others. - ART GYM DENVER
See Día de los Muertos-inspired art by Tony Ortega and others.
Art Gym Denver
Día de los Muertos
Ingrid vB. Porter, Other Worldly
Ian Bullard and Hillary Muramoto, Gauntlet Eyes
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
November 1 through 23
Opening Reception: Thursday, November 1, 5 to 8 p.m.

Art Gym gives over its main gallery to a group Día de los Muertos exhibition curated by resident artist and printmaker Tony Ortega, who also participates in the nod to the Mexican tradition. In the Common Space Gallery, two shows — Other Worldly, by painter and book artist Ingrid vB. Porter, and Gauntlet Eyes, with works by metalsmith Hillary Muramoto and artist Ian Bullard. Word is that there’ll be chocolate at the reception.


click to enlarge Thomas Scharfenberg's installation for Self at ReCreative Gallery. - THOMAS SCHARFENBERG
Thomas Scharfenberg's installation for Self at ReCreative Gallery.
Thomas Scharfenberg
Self
ReCreative Denver, 765 Santa Fe Drive
Opening Reception: Friday, November 2, 6 to 9 p.m.

Get real: Wrangled together by Curtis Tucker and Danielle Cunningham-Tierney, the group show Self takes a deep look at how to present oneself three-dimensionally in a world where social media blankets the truth under a glossy surface. Dianna Miguez, Wyatt Scott, Thomas Scharfenberg, Kelly Shortandqueer, Michael F. Sperandeo and Frankie Toan give online personalities a reality check with their installations and artwork, some of them elaborating further with a series of consecutive Saturday workshops in November. Make a zine with Caito Foster of Spit Poet Zine and the Denver Zine Library on November 3 ($5); Sperandeo dishes on digital symbols on November 10 ($20); and Wyatt Scott invites folks to hang out and sculpt noodle people on November 17 ($20). Buy tickets in advance online at ReCreative’s home page or at the door.

click to enlarge Tracy Weil, "Neighborhoods," detail. - TRACY WEIL
Tracy Weil, "Neighborhoods," detail.
Tracy Weil
Neighborhoods: New Work by Tracy Weil
Weilworks, 3611 Chestnut Place
Opening Reception: Friday, November 2, 5 to 9 p.m.
Open by appointment only thereafter via [email protected].

Tracy Weil is the grand old man of RiNo, a warehouse-district pioneer who built his distinctive Chestnut Street tower in a run-down neighborhood in the northwest corner of Five Points long before RiNo had a name, much less an art district. Weil used to regularly mount gallery exhibitions at his quirky home base and studio, but years of starting up art districts, building community for artists and tomato farming kept him too busy to be a gallerist, too. But things change, and Weil is ready to open the doors of Weilworks to the public again for "Neighborhoods," his own large-scale, twenty-by-seven-foot, mural-esque painting inspired by the legacies and history of the once-forgotten connecting neighborhoods surrounding RiNo. Have a gander and learn the painting’s full story, then head across the street, where the Ironton Distillery is reviving Ironton Gallery with a show by tattoo artists Sam Parker and Scott Santee.

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