Next stop, Kansas! But before you leave the state, stop off at Rip Griffin's and refuel with "The Fill-up," a giant omelette stuffed with chopped chicken-fried steak and American cheese that's glued together with white gravy -- the same white gravy that's poured all over the top. That should hold you till Topeka.
Next stop, Kansas! But before you leave the state, stop off at Rip Griffin's and refuel with "The Fill-up," a giant omelette stuffed with chopped chicken-fried steak and American cheese that's glued together with white gravy -- the same white gravy that's poured all over the top. That should hold you till Topeka.
The third time's a charm for the margaritas served at Dixons, Racines and Goodfriends, a trio of local eateries owned by Lee Goodfriend, David Racine and Dixon Staples. Try as we might, and we've tried them all (it's a dirty job but we're urp to the task), we have yet to find a better margarita. The devilishly good drink is in the details: For the hand-shaken house margarita, an icy, twelve-ounce shaker is filled with Sauza Gold, blue agave, lime and triple sec (so austere, so sincere); the Greyhound adds a grapefruit bite for more adventurous drinkers. Or pair your favorite mixers with one of their dozens of tequilas. Conveniently, it just so happens that these elixirs go remarkably well with the Southwestern food at Dixons, the upscale sandwiches at Racines, and the just-in-for-a-quick-bite snacks at Goodfriends. Too many of these potions, though, and you'll need more than the hair of the dog to recover the next morning. Might we suggest a hearty breakfast at Racines or Dixons?
The third time's a charm for the margaritas served at Dixons, Racines and Goodfriends, a trio of local eateries owned by Lee Goodfriend, David Racine and Dixon Staples. Try as we might, and we've tried them all (it's a dirty job but we're urp to the task), we have yet to find a better margarita. The devilishly good drink is in the details: For the hand-shaken house margarita, an icy, twelve-ounce shaker is filled with Sauza Gold, blue agave, lime and triple sec (so austere, so sincere); the Greyhound adds a grapefruit bite for more adventurous drinkers. Or pair your favorite mixers with one of their dozens of tequilas. Conveniently, it just so happens that these elixirs go remarkably well with the Southwestern food at Dixons, the upscale sandwiches at Racines, and the just-in-for-a-quick-bite snacks at Goodfriends. Too many of these potions, though, and you'll need more than the hair of the dog to recover the next morning. Might we suggest a hearty breakfast at Racines or Dixons?
After a brief, dark period during which it dropped its burritos and went upscale, Barricuda's -- formerly the Ogden Cafe -- is back in the swim. Its breakfast burrito is still a killer: stuffed with scrambled eggs, salty home-fried spuds and your choice of ham, sausage or bacon, and smothered in a gringo green chile of the gods. (Despite its name, it's also offered all day.) At $3.95, this isn't the cheapest breakfast burrito in town, but it's large enough to get you through the day. Wash it down with a darned good two-buck Bloody Mary or two, and you may not have much of a day left to get through. Good morning to you, too.

Barricuda's
After a brief, dark period during which it dropped its burritos and went upscale, Barricuda's -- formerly the Ogden Cafe -- is back in the swim. Its breakfast burrito is still a killer: stuffed with scrambled eggs, salty home-fried spuds and your choice of ham, sausage or bacon, and smothered in a gringo green chile of the gods. (Despite its name, it's also offered all day.) At $3.95, this isn't the cheapest breakfast burrito in town, but it's large enough to get you through the day. Wash it down with a darned good two-buck Bloody Mary or two, and you may not have much of a day left to get through. Good morning to you, too.

From her place of honor on the wall, Our Lady of Guadalupe has her eye on everyone who enters this bright storefront -- and we think she likes what she sees coming out as well. Taquería Pérez makes the most wonderful tacos in town: flat, round, soft corn tortillas are mounted with meats that tickle your tastebuds. Look up when you get to the order window: The posted menu explains the options -- lengua is tongue, carefully diced and pepper-rubbed; cesos is brain; tripas is tripe, barbacoa is "bar-b-que," spicy and melt-in-your-mouth tender. What the menu doesn't tell you is that each version -- you get four for five bucks, lettuce, tomato, onion and cilantro included -- is something special. We dare you to eat just one.
From her place of honor on the wall, Our Lady of Guadalupe has her eye on everyone who enters this bright storefront -- and we think she likes what she sees coming out as well. Taquería Pérez makes the most wonderful tacos in town: flat, round, soft corn tortillas are mounted with meats that tickle your tastebuds. Look up when you get to the order window: The posted menu explains the options -- lengua is tongue, carefully diced and pepper-rubbed; cesos is brain; tripas is tripe, barbacoa is "bar-b-que," spicy and melt-in-your-mouth tender. What the menu doesn't tell you is that each version -- you get four for five bucks, lettuce, tomato, onion and cilantro included -- is something special. We dare you to eat just one.
Go south, young man, for the wildest, woolliest green chile in the West. Bill "Wild Willy" Miller has parlayed his extensive line of commercial salsas and chiles into Wild Willy's Capsicum Cantina, a colorful little eatery that puts his products to a real taste test. The menu is short and spicy: just a few wraps, a couple of tacos, chips and salsa and some sides. The important thing to know is that any of these dishes can be smothered in Wild Willy's chiles, which include a sirloin-primed red and an unusual green, in which chicken and white beans add flavor and texture. But we really go hog-wild over the chile verde con puerco, a classic New Mexico-style green that's packed with pork loin and kickass chiles. This is one hot green, with enough chile punch to knock you out of yer boots. Yee-haw!
Go south, young man, for the wildest, woolliest green chile in the West. Bill "Wild Willy" Miller has parlayed his extensive line of commercial salsas and chiles into Wild Willy's Capsicum Cantina, a colorful little eatery that puts his products to a real taste test. The menu is short and spicy: just a few wraps, a couple of tacos, chips and salsa and some sides. The important thing to know is that any of these dishes can be smothered in Wild Willy's chiles, which include a sirloin-primed red and an unusual green, in which chicken and white beans add flavor and texture. But we really go hog-wild over the chile verde con puerco, a classic New Mexico-style green that's packed with pork loin and kickass chiles. This is one hot green, with enough chile punch to knock you out of yer boots. Yee-haw!

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